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Name of Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Mohammed Chowdhury

Faculty Sponsor Email

mchowd10@kennesaw.edu

Abstract

Heart Disease has many different risk factors, including hypertension (high blood pressure) and high cholesterol. Research has shown that hypertension can be identified as early as adolescence, and preventative measures can be instilled in this age. However, the relationship between hypertension, high cholesterol, race, and income have not been studied in detail among adolescents. The present study analyzed the effects of different health factors on blood pressure and cholesterol levels in Caucasian and African-American girls ages 9-21 years old, the prime of adolescence. The dataset was part of a larger study completed by the National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute and included 2,379 girls from the ages of 9-21 years. The data were analyzed using R- Statistical Software using logistic regression, t-tests for mean, multinomial regression, analysis of variance, and chi-square test of independence. There were significant differences between Caucasian and African-American girls for several different health factors. Caucasian girls were found to have lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures, but African-American girls were found to have higher high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Caucasian girls were found to have significantly higher triglyceride levels then African-American girls. Further, income, body mass index, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure were found to be highly related to race. Income and systolic blood pressure were also found to be highly related. As systolic blood pressure increased, the odds of being African-American increased. This was also found to be true in regard to body mass index. Many risk factors seem to have their roots in childhood, and this information may lead to better prevention techniques. Future studies should also investigate these health factors in adolescent boys.

Library Essay.docx (472 kB)
This is the essay for the Library Research Award.

Paper 8.15.17.docx (128 kB)