The Master of Arts in Professional Writing program (MAPW) is a professional graduate degree program that prepares candidates for a wide variety of writing-related positions in business, education, publishing, and the arts. Coursework in three concentrations applied writing, composition and rhetoric, and creative writing allows students to gain theoretical and practical knowledge in various fields of professional writing. As students become experienced in producing and analyzing business, technical, journalistic, and creative texts, they develop a sophisticated understanding of style, structure, and audience. MAPW students will become writing professionals who can move in many directions during their careers. They will become flexible writers who can tune in to the writing conventions of a given genre, adapting their writing style to the requirements of various rhetorical contexts.

What is the MAPW Capstone Project?
A project designated as a thesis, portfolio or practicum and accompanied by a rationale for its purpose and design that involves electronic and/or print media and is relevant to the student’s concentration in professional writing. After submitting an approved capstone proposal, the candidate works under the direction and advice of two faculty members to produce the project. The candidate must submit the capstone project at least two weeks before either 1) a discussion about the project with the faculty committee, or 2) a public presentation about the project or a reading from the project for an audience of faculty and peers.

Time to Submit your Capstone Project?

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Theses/Dissertations from 2013

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Critical Thinking and Argument in First-Year-Composition: A Two-Part Assignment, Jason Burge

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Crisis and Opportunity, Peggy Comin

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Capstone Practicum, Kiran Damania

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On Leave: A Novella, Andrew T. Duvall

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The Mark of a Dead Man, Dylan K. Edwards

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Social Media and Peer Review: Edmodo in the Composition Classroom, Mark Gardner

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Storm Stories, Megan Gehring

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Flickers in the Dark, Stephanie Hines

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The Use of Rhetoric in Public Relations: Kenneth Burke's Theory of Identification and Consubstantiality, Chonticia Y. Jackson

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Working in a Second Language, Nicole V. Lyu

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Second Coming on South Cobb Drive: Poems, Christopher Martin

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Voices in Cyberspace: Testing the Effectiveness of Blogs as a Tool for Improving Voice in Student Writing, Caitlin Martinez

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The Impact of User-Created Content on Traditional News, Aneesah McDonald

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Last Trip to Disneyland, Freeman Mensa Montaque

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Belong: Poetry and Prose on Being Adopted, Karen Pickell

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Thresholds, Gabriel J. Pline

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The Inn That Almost Wasn't: The Life and Times of the Len Foote Hike Inn, Jessica M. Price

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Sisters of Sun and Moon, Crystal Rast

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Remix and Rebalance: Copyright and Fair Use Issues in the Digital Age and English Studies, Scott A. Singleton

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Finding Home, Ana Sosa

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Z Word, Danielle Southwell

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SociaLeighFood Memoir Cookbook, Leigh Takata

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MAPW Thesis, Nathan M. Ware

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Writing My Peace: Transforming Tragedy Into Art, Precious C. Williams

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Perry Island, Stan Wyatt

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To Love Again?, Shunkedra Zachery

Theses/Dissertations from 2011

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The Soul's Enslavers, Brenna L. Aldrich

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Life, Love, Sex, and Everything In Between, Patti Beckett

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Tapping My Way Through World War II, Janice G. Carter

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The Gamer, Heather Cook

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Artists Connect, Barbara Ann Cramer

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Find Me Here, Kristi DeMeester

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When the Crisis Communications Plan is the Crisis, Kim Dimson

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Love Everlasting: A Memoir, Arthur Harris

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The Mindstorm, Jeffrey P. Harrison

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The Body, Kristen Brooke Harrison

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Supporting the Non-profit Sector: A Grant Writing Project for The Georgia Ballet, Sarah Hocut