Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Social Work and Human Services

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Darlene Xiomara Rodriguez, PhD, MSW, MPA

Abstract (300 words maximum)

HS 3600 Program Development and Evaluation in Nonprofit Organizations

Abstract

Parenting is not an easy task, but during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, parenting especially for women who work outside the home and were caregivers for the young and old had an exceptionally onerous time. According to Brookings (2020), “COVID-19 has also increased the pressure on working mothers, low-wage and otherwise. In a survey from May and June, one out of four women who became unemployed during the pandemic reported the job loss was due to a lack of childcare, twice the rate of men surveyed. A more recent survey shows the losses have not slowed down: between February and August mothers of children 12 years old and younger lost 2.2 million jobs compared to 870,000 jobs lost among fathers.” Parenting has turned into an overwhelming assignment for guardians in 2020. Among employed parents who were working from home all or most of the time, mothers were more likely than fathers to say they had a lot of childcare responsibilities while working (36% vs. 16%) mothers vs fathers. With COVID-19, schools are rapidly changing the basic way they do their work. Along with some having to become old-fashioned correspondence schools, with most of the interaction happening by written mail. In addition, others have tried to recreate the school setting online using digital tools like Zoom. While the pandemic has created problems it has also shaped new habits and trends in our society, such as daily use of technology, remote or telework, and more. Recommendations for program development will be offered as well as implications for the future of women in the compensated labor force.

Keywords: Mothers, Parents, COVID-19, Pandemic, Children, Challenges, Institutional changes

Disciplines

Family, Life Course, and Society | Inequality and Stratification | Politics and Social Change | Race and Ethnicity | Work, Economy and Organizations

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

Symposium_abstract.docx (21 kB)
Project Abstract

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Personal, Familial, and Institutional Challenges Working Mothers Faced During COVID-19

HS 3600 Program Development and Evaluation in Nonprofit Organizations

Abstract

Parenting is not an easy task, but during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, parenting especially for women who work outside the home and were caregivers for the young and old had an exceptionally onerous time. According to Brookings (2020), “COVID-19 has also increased the pressure on working mothers, low-wage and otherwise. In a survey from May and June, one out of four women who became unemployed during the pandemic reported the job loss was due to a lack of childcare, twice the rate of men surveyed. A more recent survey shows the losses have not slowed down: between February and August mothers of children 12 years old and younger lost 2.2 million jobs compared to 870,000 jobs lost among fathers.” Parenting has turned into an overwhelming assignment for guardians in 2020. Among employed parents who were working from home all or most of the time, mothers were more likely than fathers to say they had a lot of childcare responsibilities while working (36% vs. 16%) mothers vs fathers. With COVID-19, schools are rapidly changing the basic way they do their work. Along with some having to become old-fashioned correspondence schools, with most of the interaction happening by written mail. In addition, others have tried to recreate the school setting online using digital tools like Zoom. While the pandemic has created problems it has also shaped new habits and trends in our society, such as daily use of technology, remote or telework, and more. Recommendations for program development will be offered as well as implications for the future of women in the compensated labor force.

Keywords: Mothers, Parents, COVID-19, Pandemic, Children, Challenges, Institutional changes

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