Project Title

An Examination of Stress Levels and Management among Undergraduates Music Students

Academic department under which the project should be listed

COTA - Music

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Nancy Conley

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Stress is a common buzzword in undergraduate music programs and the professional music world. Researchers have found that there were higher levels of emotional exhaustion when compared to non-music majors with symptoms including depression, anxiety, lack of strong social life, physical injuries, and more. The constant demand for individual practice, rehearsals, and classes causes a sense of depersonalization, failed goals, and lack of a social life when compared to other college students. Because of this and other factors, students enrolled in a university music program tend to see a higher level of burnout and fatigue which is generally accepted as the cultural norm. This can have an enormous effect on the human body depending on the severity of the issue.

While the cause of stress has been generally researched numerous times, there are a lot fewer studies on university music students as well as prevention strategies and remedies for the stress. This study focuses on these issues of burnout, fatigue, and stress among undergraduate music students and ways to prevent and effectively aid those coping with these issues. Social wellbeing, sleep, performances in music and academic classes, time management, exercise, and nutrition were evaluated with opportunities for students to share feedback on how stress is dealt with in either healthy or unhealthy behaviors. The results were very concerning with different factors such as time management, student class and workload, and commitments are significantly influencing stress levels. Different strategies are proposed to help students better cope and bring stress levels down.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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An Examination of Stress Levels and Management among Undergraduates Music Students

Stress is a common buzzword in undergraduate music programs and the professional music world. Researchers have found that there were higher levels of emotional exhaustion when compared to non-music majors with symptoms including depression, anxiety, lack of strong social life, physical injuries, and more. The constant demand for individual practice, rehearsals, and classes causes a sense of depersonalization, failed goals, and lack of a social life when compared to other college students. Because of this and other factors, students enrolled in a university music program tend to see a higher level of burnout and fatigue which is generally accepted as the cultural norm. This can have an enormous effect on the human body depending on the severity of the issue.

While the cause of stress has been generally researched numerous times, there are a lot fewer studies on university music students as well as prevention strategies and remedies for the stress. This study focuses on these issues of burnout, fatigue, and stress among undergraduate music students and ways to prevent and effectively aid those coping with these issues. Social wellbeing, sleep, performances in music and academic classes, time management, exercise, and nutrition were evaluated with opportunities for students to share feedback on how stress is dealt with in either healthy or unhealthy behaviors. The results were very concerning with different factors such as time management, student class and workload, and commitments are significantly influencing stress levels. Different strategies are proposed to help students better cope and bring stress levels down.