Project Title

Wireless Geiger Counter Development and Verification of Radiation Principles

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

SPCEET - Mechanical Engineering

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Eduardo B. Farfán

Not doing research with live test subjects.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

In this study, a fully functional Wireless Geiger counter was developed, calibrated, and tested using various beta and gamma radiation sources including cobolt-60 and cesium-137. The calibration was completed using a calibrated rate meter. The developed Geiger counter is sensitive to background radiation. A digital meter adapter was included to enhance the Geiger counter by providing counts per minute and dose in micro-sievert. The counter also produces an audible click and blinks a LED each time it detects radiation particle such as beta particle, x-ray or gamma ray. Radiation dose limits can be set and the audible click becomes continuous when a limit, set by the user, has been reached. In addition, two principles of radiation protection were verified using the developed Geiger counter: distance and shielding. Radiation intensity decreases as the distance between a person and a radioactive source increases. This intensity reduction follows the 1/r2 law, where r is distance. Several shielding materials including water, aluminum, and lead were used to demonstrate the principle of radiation shielding.

Project Type

Poster

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Wireless Geiger Counter Development and Verification of Radiation Principles

In this study, a fully functional Wireless Geiger counter was developed, calibrated, and tested using various beta and gamma radiation sources including cobolt-60 and cesium-137. The calibration was completed using a calibrated rate meter. The developed Geiger counter is sensitive to background radiation. A digital meter adapter was included to enhance the Geiger counter by providing counts per minute and dose in micro-sievert. The counter also produces an audible click and blinks a LED each time it detects radiation particle such as beta particle, x-ray or gamma ray. Radiation dose limits can be set and the audible click becomes continuous when a limit, set by the user, has been reached. In addition, two principles of radiation protection were verified using the developed Geiger counter: distance and shielding. Radiation intensity decreases as the distance between a person and a radioactive source increases. This intensity reduction follows the 1/r2 law, where r is distance. Several shielding materials including water, aluminum, and lead were used to demonstrate the principle of radiation shielding.