Keywords

market orientation, talent workers, knowledge workers, workforce composition, marketing strategy

Document Type

Proceedings Abstract

Description

Many organizations employ marketing initiatives to “assist” in launching new efforts to both internal and external audiences and weave marketing throughout as part of being “market oriented.” The primary motivation behind a market orientation is improvement of market performance, according to the literature (Narver and Slater, 1990; Kohli and Jaworski 1990).

There is literature on workforce composition and different types of workers and this includes concepts of talent workers and knowledge workers (Chowdhury 2003) and HEROes (Bernoff and Schadler 2010) but there is little to nothing on the type of workers employed by highly market-oriented organizations. The focus of this study is on the composition of the workforce in highly market-oriented organizations. In particular, this study examines whether highly market-oriented organizations have a higher number of talent workers than knowledge workers and if lesser or non-market oriented organizations have more knowledge workers than talent workers.

 

Market Oriented Organizations and Talent Workers: Composition of the Workforce and its Influence on Market Orientation

Many organizations employ marketing initiatives to “assist” in launching new efforts to both internal and external audiences and weave marketing throughout as part of being “market oriented.” The primary motivation behind a market orientation is improvement of market performance, according to the literature (Narver and Slater, 1990; Kohli and Jaworski 1990).

There is literature on workforce composition and different types of workers and this includes concepts of talent workers and knowledge workers (Chowdhury 2003) and HEROes (Bernoff and Schadler 2010) but there is little to nothing on the type of workers employed by highly market-oriented organizations. The focus of this study is on the composition of the workforce in highly market-oriented organizations. In particular, this study examines whether highly market-oriented organizations have a higher number of talent workers than knowledge workers and if lesser or non-market oriented organizations have more knowledge workers than talent workers.