Presenters

Ami EhoFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Chemistry and Biochemistry

Research Mentor Name

Katherine H. Ingram

Additional Faculty

None other

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The Relationship Amongst Sleep, Gestational Weight Gain, and Insulin Resistance During Pregnancy

Authors: Ami Eho1, Dr. Janeen Amason2, Dr. Katherine H. Ingram3 (mentor)

INTRODUCTION: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 48% of pregnancies are affected by excessive weight gain. Gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes including insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality are correlated with weight gain in general population but the relationship between sleep and weight gain during pregnancy is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how sleep duration or sleep quality affect GWG and IR during pregnancy. METHODS: Primigravida women were recruited from a WellStar OB/GYN clinic during the second trimester of pregnancy (N=25; age= 27士4 years; pre-pregnancy BMI= 27士6 kg/m2). The previously-validated General Sleep Disturbance Scale questionnaire was used to determine quality of sleep (sleeping poorly, not feeling rested upon awakening, and not feeling satisfied with sleep) and quantity of sleep (too little sleep or too much sleep). Fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin were collected at approximately 25 weeks' gestation. Insulin resistance was assessed by the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR= fasting insulin (mU/L) x fasting glucose (mg/dL)/405). GWG refers to weight gained from pre-pregnancy to end of pregnancy. RESULTS: A linear correlation between GWG and quantity of sleep (r = 0.550, p = 0.015) was observed, along with a non-significant trend between GWG and HOMA-IR (r = 0.408, p =0.053). No relationship was found between HOMA-IR and sleep quality or quantity. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that increased sleep duration is associated with GWG during pregnancy. Therefore, screening for sleep disturbances during pregnancy may be of clinical significance.

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

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The Relationship Amongst Sleep, Gestational Weight Gain, and Insulin Resistance During Pregnancy

The Relationship Amongst Sleep, Gestational Weight Gain, and Insulin Resistance During Pregnancy

Authors: Ami Eho1, Dr. Janeen Amason2, Dr. Katherine H. Ingram3 (mentor)

INTRODUCTION: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 48% of pregnancies are affected by excessive weight gain. Gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes including insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality are correlated with weight gain in general population but the relationship between sleep and weight gain during pregnancy is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how sleep duration or sleep quality affect GWG and IR during pregnancy. METHODS: Primigravida women were recruited from a WellStar OB/GYN clinic during the second trimester of pregnancy (N=25; age= 27士4 years; pre-pregnancy BMI= 27士6 kg/m2). The previously-validated General Sleep Disturbance Scale questionnaire was used to determine quality of sleep (sleeping poorly, not feeling rested upon awakening, and not feeling satisfied with sleep) and quantity of sleep (too little sleep or too much sleep). Fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin were collected at approximately 25 weeks' gestation. Insulin resistance was assessed by the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR= fasting insulin (mU/L) x fasting glucose (mg/dL)/405). GWG refers to weight gained from pre-pregnancy to end of pregnancy. RESULTS: A linear correlation between GWG and quantity of sleep (r = 0.550, p = 0.015) was observed, along with a non-significant trend between GWG and HOMA-IR (r = 0.408, p =0.053). No relationship was found between HOMA-IR and sleep quality or quantity. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that increased sleep duration is associated with GWG during pregnancy. Therefore, screening for sleep disturbances during pregnancy may be of clinical significance.