Project Title

ESKAPing Antimicrobial Resistance

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Molecular and Cellular Biology

Research Mentor Name

Melanie Griffin

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Antimicrobial resistance of numerous infectious agents, particularly of bacterial pathogens collectively referred to as ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) and pathogenic yeast (Candida), is rapidly increasing. This poses a significant threat to human health as reports estimate that over 2 million Americans are annually infected with antimicrobial-resistant pathogens, and nearly 30,000 of these infections turn lethal. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial measures against these pathogens. Our lab, in collaboration with other KSU researchers (Halim: novel peptides and Haddow: novel bacteriophages), is seeking new ways for microbial control. This project specifically aims to establish the antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance profiles of the clinical and standard lab isolates of ESKAPE and Candida strains currently available at Kennesaw State University for use in microbial control studies. Using commercial multi-well antimicrobial plates, we will test 10-12 strains for susceptibility or resistance to up to 94 different antibiotics or antimicrobics. The clinical plate types to be used are specific to Gram-negative species, Gram-positive species, or yeast. A standardized microbial culture will be inoculated into the wells of the appropriate plate and incubated. Each plate will be visually inspected and scored for growth (qualitative analysis). Then, a SpectraMax multi-mode plate reader will be used to determine the optical density (OD) (quantitative analysis). For each strain, the qualitative and quantitative data will be correlated to determine the minimal threshold for the OD reading to be considered growth and therefore resistance. In this manner, the antibiotic resistance and susceptibility profile will be constructed for each of the strains. These profiles will serve as the basis for future research into the development and assessment of alternative antimicrobial measures, such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides currently underway at KSU.

Disciplines

Pathogenic Microbiology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

ESKAPing Antimicrobial Resistance

Antimicrobial resistance of numerous infectious agents, particularly of bacterial pathogens collectively referred to as ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) and pathogenic yeast (Candida), is rapidly increasing. This poses a significant threat to human health as reports estimate that over 2 million Americans are annually infected with antimicrobial-resistant pathogens, and nearly 30,000 of these infections turn lethal. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial measures against these pathogens. Our lab, in collaboration with other KSU researchers (Halim: novel peptides and Haddow: novel bacteriophages), is seeking new ways for microbial control. This project specifically aims to establish the antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance profiles of the clinical and standard lab isolates of ESKAPE and Candida strains currently available at Kennesaw State University for use in microbial control studies. Using commercial multi-well antimicrobial plates, we will test 10-12 strains for susceptibility or resistance to up to 94 different antibiotics or antimicrobics. The clinical plate types to be used are specific to Gram-negative species, Gram-positive species, or yeast. A standardized microbial culture will be inoculated into the wells of the appropriate plate and incubated. Each plate will be visually inspected and scored for growth (qualitative analysis). Then, a SpectraMax multi-mode plate reader will be used to determine the optical density (OD) (quantitative analysis). For each strain, the qualitative and quantitative data will be correlated to determine the minimal threshold for the OD reading to be considered growth and therefore resistance. In this manner, the antibiotic resistance and susceptibility profile will be constructed for each of the strains. These profiles will serve as the basis for future research into the development and assessment of alternative antimicrobial measures, such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides currently underway at KSU.