Project Title

Levels of Religiosity and Vaccine Intentions in Young Adults

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Health Promotion and Physical Education

Faculty Sponsor Name

Afekwo Ukuku

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Vaccines are an essential part of herd immunity and keeping populations safe from disease. They work by training the immune system to create antibodies and fight off infections. Many individuals forgo the option to vaccinate based on social determinants such as religious values or beliefs. This becomes an issue when preventable diseases sweep through a population and vaccine hesitancy rises. To examine the role that religiosity plays in an individual's health decision making, a survey will be conducted.

Young adults aged 18-30 will be recruited to participate in a 30 minute questionnaire to evaluate their religious beliefs and health decision making. The participants must identify with a religious organization and be located within the metro Atlanta, Georgia area. The Duke University Religion Index (DUREL) will be used to evaluate participants' religious involvement in three major domains: organizational religious activity, non-organizational religious activity, and intrinsic religiosity. The Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV) survey tool will be used to evaluate participants’ values towards vaccinations based on the Health Belief Model (perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits and self-efficacy). The survey will examine participants’ attitudes towards these factors and of the impact of other social determinants. This study hopes to improve knowledge on how religion plays a role in one’s health decision making. Data collected will inform researchers, educators, and public health professionals on how to educate the general public on the importance of vaccines.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, synchronously via Teams

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Levels of Religiosity and Vaccine Intentions in Young Adults

Vaccines are an essential part of herd immunity and keeping populations safe from disease. They work by training the immune system to create antibodies and fight off infections. Many individuals forgo the option to vaccinate based on social determinants such as religious values or beliefs. This becomes an issue when preventable diseases sweep through a population and vaccine hesitancy rises. To examine the role that religiosity plays in an individual's health decision making, a survey will be conducted.

Young adults aged 18-30 will be recruited to participate in a 30 minute questionnaire to evaluate their religious beliefs and health decision making. The participants must identify with a religious organization and be located within the metro Atlanta, Georgia area. The Duke University Religion Index (DUREL) will be used to evaluate participants' religious involvement in three major domains: organizational religious activity, non-organizational religious activity, and intrinsic religiosity. The Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV) survey tool will be used to evaluate participants’ values towards vaccinations based on the Health Belief Model (perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits and self-efficacy). The survey will examine participants’ attitudes towards these factors and of the impact of other social determinants. This study hopes to improve knowledge on how religion plays a role in one’s health decision making. Data collected will inform researchers, educators, and public health professionals on how to educate the general public on the importance of vaccines.

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