Presenters

Bianca GumusFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Jan Turner

Abstract (300 words maximum)

In the postpartum period, a nurse’s most vital role is educating the patient and preparing her for discharge. Breastfeeding in the postpartum period can be challenging to new mothers, and proper guidance from the nurse is essential in boosting the patient’s confidence and satisfaction. Successful breastfeeding in the postpartum period is linked to decreased bleeding, decreased risk of postpartum depression, and improved health outcomes for mother and baby (ACOG, n.d.). When postpartum mothers feel they did not receive enough education or guidance from the healthcare team, they are more likely to be dissatisfied with their overall care (Wagner & Washington, 2016). Research suggests that postpartum patients feel more prepared when nurses spend more one-on-one time at the bedside during breastfeeding to assist and answer questions (Buchko et al., 2012). At an Atlanta hospital, patient satisfaction rates are 74%, with the lowest satisfaction in education and discharge information. This hospital’s mother-baby unit employs one lactation consultant, meaning when she is unavailable, breastfeeding education is done by the nurse. The mother-baby nurses are not trained in lactation, therefore, the quality of teaching that each patient receives varies based upon the nurse. The purpose of this project is to implement a comprehensive breastfeeding training program for mother-baby nurses to improve patient education and bring patient satisfaction to 90%. The training program will utilize the three-day Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative’s course including written materials, demonstrations, and role play to create a consistent knowledge base that equips nurses to adequately teach patients about breastfeeding. Nurses will be educated on positioning, colostrum, hormones, anatomy, feeding cues, and an abundance of knowledge and skills needed for breastfeeding education. Three months after all mother-baby nurses have completed the training, patient satisfaction surveys will be reviewed. The project will be considered successful if patient satisfaction rises to 90% or higher.

Keywords: Postpartum, breastfeeding, mother-baby, nursing, training, lactation, education, satisfaction, discharge, patient

References

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (n.d.). Breastfeeding benefits. https://www.acog.org/womens-health/infographics/breastfeeding-benefits

Buchko, B. L., Gutshall, C. H., & Jordan, E. T. (2012). Improving quality and efficiency of postpartum hospital education. The Journal of Perinatal Education, 21(4), 238-247. https://dx.doi.org/10.1891%2F1058-1243.21.4.238

Wagner, D. L., & Washington, C. (2016). Patient satisfaction with postpartum teaching methods. The Journal of Perinatal Education, 25(2), 129-136. https://dx.doi.org/10.1891%2F1058-1243.25.2.129

Disciplines

Maternal, Child Health and Neonatal Nursing | Medicine and Health Sciences | Nursing

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Breastfeeding Education: A Training Program for Mother-Baby Nurses

In the postpartum period, a nurse’s most vital role is educating the patient and preparing her for discharge. Breastfeeding in the postpartum period can be challenging to new mothers, and proper guidance from the nurse is essential in boosting the patient’s confidence and satisfaction. Successful breastfeeding in the postpartum period is linked to decreased bleeding, decreased risk of postpartum depression, and improved health outcomes for mother and baby (ACOG, n.d.). When postpartum mothers feel they did not receive enough education or guidance from the healthcare team, they are more likely to be dissatisfied with their overall care (Wagner & Washington, 2016). Research suggests that postpartum patients feel more prepared when nurses spend more one-on-one time at the bedside during breastfeeding to assist and answer questions (Buchko et al., 2012). At an Atlanta hospital, patient satisfaction rates are 74%, with the lowest satisfaction in education and discharge information. This hospital’s mother-baby unit employs one lactation consultant, meaning when she is unavailable, breastfeeding education is done by the nurse. The mother-baby nurses are not trained in lactation, therefore, the quality of teaching that each patient receives varies based upon the nurse. The purpose of this project is to implement a comprehensive breastfeeding training program for mother-baby nurses to improve patient education and bring patient satisfaction to 90%. The training program will utilize the three-day Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative’s course including written materials, demonstrations, and role play to create a consistent knowledge base that equips nurses to adequately teach patients about breastfeeding. Nurses will be educated on positioning, colostrum, hormones, anatomy, feeding cues, and an abundance of knowledge and skills needed for breastfeeding education. Three months after all mother-baby nurses have completed the training, patient satisfaction surveys will be reviewed. The project will be considered successful if patient satisfaction rises to 90% or higher.

Keywords: Postpartum, breastfeeding, mother-baby, nursing, training, lactation, education, satisfaction, discharge, patient

References

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (n.d.). Breastfeeding benefits. https://www.acog.org/womens-health/infographics/breastfeeding-benefits

Buchko, B. L., Gutshall, C. H., & Jordan, E. T. (2012). Improving quality and efficiency of postpartum hospital education. The Journal of Perinatal Education, 21(4), 238-247. https://dx.doi.org/10.1891%2F1058-1243.21.4.238

Wagner, D. L., & Washington, C. (2016). Patient satisfaction with postpartum teaching methods. The Journal of Perinatal Education, 25(2), 129-136. https://dx.doi.org/10.1891%2F1058-1243.25.2.129

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