Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Geography & Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Terry Powis

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Foundationally archaeology is defined as the scientific study of material remains, uncovered through survey and excavation. Meaning the field is dependent upon the accumulation of things: ceramics, stone tools, natural material, historic artifacts, etc. One way in which site assemblages are dealt with is through the process of curation, the storage and care of assemblages for extended periods. This is a varying process, across nations, states, and institutions. In the context of the United States, the National Preservation Act (1966), Reservoir Salvage Act (1960), and Archaeological Resource Protection Act (1979) provide standards for the long-term storage and management of archaeological material. Material is passed through the hands of three groups within this process: field technicians, lab technicians, and curators. Perspectives from these three groups makes up the foundations for research in this case, with specific focus given to the latter two. How and to what extent does each level interact with curation? What are the different problems each faces in the curation process? How do individuals in these areas interact with one another? To explore these issues, an assemblage from Pickett’s Mill, a Civil War battlefield site located in Paulding County, Georgia, is to be prepared for curation at a state-recognized institution. Following the steps involved in the initial qualification for curation will provide insight into the issues lab technicians encounter in curation and better understand the relationship(s) between the three groups.

Disciplines

Archaeological Anthropology | Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, synchronously via Teams

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Analyzing Perspectives on Archaeological Curation: A Case Study from the Civil War Site of Pickett’s Mill

Foundationally archaeology is defined as the scientific study of material remains, uncovered through survey and excavation. Meaning the field is dependent upon the accumulation of things: ceramics, stone tools, natural material, historic artifacts, etc. One way in which site assemblages are dealt with is through the process of curation, the storage and care of assemblages for extended periods. This is a varying process, across nations, states, and institutions. In the context of the United States, the National Preservation Act (1966), Reservoir Salvage Act (1960), and Archaeological Resource Protection Act (1979) provide standards for the long-term storage and management of archaeological material. Material is passed through the hands of three groups within this process: field technicians, lab technicians, and curators. Perspectives from these three groups makes up the foundations for research in this case, with specific focus given to the latter two. How and to what extent does each level interact with curation? What are the different problems each faces in the curation process? How do individuals in these areas interact with one another? To explore these issues, an assemblage from Pickett’s Mill, a Civil War battlefield site located in Paulding County, Georgia, is to be prepared for curation at a state-recognized institution. Following the steps involved in the initial qualification for curation will provide insight into the issues lab technicians encounter in curation and better understand the relationship(s) between the three groups.

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