Presenters

Luke SamsFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Geography & Anthropology

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Paul McDaniel

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Statistical data has shown that minority groups in the United States are at an increased risk of long-term health issues, and see higher overall morbidity, mortality and premature death rates than other populations. The reasons for this are manifold, stemming from causes ranging from decreased access to healthcare to higher rates of stress. Many of these issues are seen as a complex of interlinked problems among social injustice, discrimination and the socioeconomic implications of these factors. During the COVID-19 pandemic, all aspects of society were impacted, and social issues of all types came to the forefront of public conversation. Also, a subject of discussion was how many of these impacts were disproportionately affecting those in poverty, vulnerable populations, and minorities more than the rest of the populace in the US and elsewhere. The primary purpose of this study is investigating how the status of minorities in the United States has shaped geographical rates of mortality (deaths among a population) and morbidity (cases of disease among a population) during the COVID-19 pandemic. The principal question the study addresses is that of whether minority populations are, as is the case with many other health issues in the United States, more adversely affected than the general population by the disease and its outcomes. It is anticipated that areas with higher proportions of minorities in the population will see higher rates of mortality from COVID-19. The study uses Centers for Disease Control (CDC) case data in coordination with United States Census statistics in order to compare and contrast rates of death in different geographic areas.

Disciplines

Geography | Human Geography

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Geographic Variations in Rates of Morbidity and Mortality Among Minority Populations During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Statistical data has shown that minority groups in the United States are at an increased risk of long-term health issues, and see higher overall morbidity, mortality and premature death rates than other populations. The reasons for this are manifold, stemming from causes ranging from decreased access to healthcare to higher rates of stress. Many of these issues are seen as a complex of interlinked problems among social injustice, discrimination and the socioeconomic implications of these factors. During the COVID-19 pandemic, all aspects of society were impacted, and social issues of all types came to the forefront of public conversation. Also, a subject of discussion was how many of these impacts were disproportionately affecting those in poverty, vulnerable populations, and minorities more than the rest of the populace in the US and elsewhere. The primary purpose of this study is investigating how the status of minorities in the United States has shaped geographical rates of mortality (deaths among a population) and morbidity (cases of disease among a population) during the COVID-19 pandemic. The principal question the study addresses is that of whether minority populations are, as is the case with many other health issues in the United States, more adversely affected than the general population by the disease and its outcomes. It is anticipated that areas with higher proportions of minorities in the population will see higher rates of mortality from COVID-19. The study uses Centers for Disease Control (CDC) case data in coordination with United States Census statistics in order to compare and contrast rates of death in different geographic areas.

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