Presenters

Matthew CoxFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Geography & Anthropology

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Paul McDaniel

Abstract (300 words maximum)

In May 2017, Atlanta’s City Council embarked on a mission to transition its energy sources to one-hundred percent clean energy by 2035. In 2018, Atlanta’s energy was sourced from 5 areas: hydroelectric, coal, solar, natural gas, and nuclear. To achieve its goal, Atlanta must play a game in which it shifts the percentages of each energy source that is contributing to its overall energy supply. The costs of cleaning an entire energy system are high, which means that there will most certainly be a burden placed on Atlanta residents. With Atlanta’s greater focus on converting to sustainability, it is important that those living at or below poverty levels are not left behind. This research investigates how Atlanta plans on transitioning to one-hundred percent clean energy as well as its financial implications on those living in lower income brackets within the city limits. The journey to being fully clean energy sourced is a difficult one and seemingly impossible one for Atlanta to accomplish by 2035; however, by looking to other cities in the United States, a clear and reasonable pathway might present itself for Atlanta to achieve its goal. Nonetheless, it is important for Atlanta to be flexible with its timeline because the goal is to achieve a city that is sourced solely from clean energy sources regardless of what year this is accomplished.

Disciplines

Physical and Environmental Geography

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Cleaning Atlanta’s Energy: A Hopeful Future for Urban Societies and Systems

In May 2017, Atlanta’s City Council embarked on a mission to transition its energy sources to one-hundred percent clean energy by 2035. In 2018, Atlanta’s energy was sourced from 5 areas: hydroelectric, coal, solar, natural gas, and nuclear. To achieve its goal, Atlanta must play a game in which it shifts the percentages of each energy source that is contributing to its overall energy supply. The costs of cleaning an entire energy system are high, which means that there will most certainly be a burden placed on Atlanta residents. With Atlanta’s greater focus on converting to sustainability, it is important that those living at or below poverty levels are not left behind. This research investigates how Atlanta plans on transitioning to one-hundred percent clean energy as well as its financial implications on those living in lower income brackets within the city limits. The journey to being fully clean energy sourced is a difficult one and seemingly impossible one for Atlanta to accomplish by 2035; however, by looking to other cities in the United States, a clear and reasonable pathway might present itself for Atlanta to achieve its goal. Nonetheless, it is important for Atlanta to be flexible with its timeline because the goal is to achieve a city that is sourced solely from clean energy sources regardless of what year this is accomplished.

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