Presenters

Raina DavisFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Christie Emerson

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Abstract

Becoming an RN is never an easy feat, yet within the last half a decade there have been numerous studies done that illuminate significantly higher levels of anxiety, stress, and burnout rates in new nurses. There are many facets to why these levels are rising exponentially in new nurses, and one factor that contributes to these higher levels of anxiety and stress is the alterations that occurred to initial on-the-job training due to the pandemic. The importance of training rose when many universities had to go completely virtual because new nurses were graduating with as little as zero in-person clinical hours. Utilizing PubMed illuminated that additional literature reviews focused on how overburdened nurses create poorer trainers, the average age of nurses declined significantly within the last five years, a lack of financial compensation creates lower drive to give quality training, as well as the presence of travel nurses could be causing strain on onboarding processes. All of this background supports why increasing training standards and durations for new pulmonary nurses at inpatient hospitals could decrease the significantly elevated levels of stress, anxiety, and burnout. Outcomes of this new training intervention will be measured utilizing the Anxiety Symptoms Checklist and an adapted version of the College Student Stress Scale; using these measurements ensures for an accurate analysis to previous results. Furthermore, these findings would go to statistically support why creating training courses that address many of the current flaws in on-the-job training are paramount for creating a confidently competent new generation of nurses.

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Altering Training to Decrease Anxiety and Stress in Newly Graduated Pulmonary Nurses

Abstract

Becoming an RN is never an easy feat, yet within the last half a decade there have been numerous studies done that illuminate significantly higher levels of anxiety, stress, and burnout rates in new nurses. There are many facets to why these levels are rising exponentially in new nurses, and one factor that contributes to these higher levels of anxiety and stress is the alterations that occurred to initial on-the-job training due to the pandemic. The importance of training rose when many universities had to go completely virtual because new nurses were graduating with as little as zero in-person clinical hours. Utilizing PubMed illuminated that additional literature reviews focused on how overburdened nurses create poorer trainers, the average age of nurses declined significantly within the last five years, a lack of financial compensation creates lower drive to give quality training, as well as the presence of travel nurses could be causing strain on onboarding processes. All of this background supports why increasing training standards and durations for new pulmonary nurses at inpatient hospitals could decrease the significantly elevated levels of stress, anxiety, and burnout. Outcomes of this new training intervention will be measured utilizing the Anxiety Symptoms Checklist and an adapted version of the College Student Stress Scale; using these measurements ensures for an accurate analysis to previous results. Furthermore, these findings would go to statistically support why creating training courses that address many of the current flaws in on-the-job training are paramount for creating a confidently competent new generation of nurses.

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