Project Title

Improving Nurse Education on Breastfeeding

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Christie Emerson

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: Maternal and newborn patients in the hospital are usually focused on recovery and now recently bonding, but the importance of long-term education on breast feeding is just as important. Breastfeeding provides many benefits for the other and child bond, along with core nutrients and important antibodies for the child’s developing immune system. The study aims to improve nurse education on breastfeeding and how to properly instruct first time mothers how to correctly latch. Literature Review: Research shows that mothers do not continue breastfeeding after hospitalization due to lack of support and the lack of education on how to correctly breastfeed. There are many more benefits of breastfeeding compared to formula feeding the newborn. In a study that was taken, 25% of mothers are educated on breastfeeding, another 25% are partially educated and 50% are not educated. The inadequate knowledge and education on breastfeeding caused the mothers to go to formula-feeding. Methods: All women’s health nurses will be required to take a class taught by a lactation specialist on breastfeeding. The lactation specialist will educate the nurses how to correctly breastfeed, what will enhance the breast to produce more milk, and the benefits of breastfeeding a child. The nurses can relay the knowledge that they learned to educate mothers throughout and after their pregnancy on breastfeeding. Evaluation: Postpartum mothers will be asked multiple questions about how to breastfeed properly and will use the teach method to the nurse. They will also be asked questions about the benefits of breastfeeding to evaluate if they understand how important breastfeeding is for their child. The impact of the teachings will be measured by an increase in the numbers of mothers who are able to breastfeed and their knowledge.

Disciplines

Maternal, Child Health and Neonatal Nursing

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Improving Nurse Education on Breastfeeding

Background: Maternal and newborn patients in the hospital are usually focused on recovery and now recently bonding, but the importance of long-term education on breast feeding is just as important. Breastfeeding provides many benefits for the other and child bond, along with core nutrients and important antibodies for the child’s developing immune system. The study aims to improve nurse education on breastfeeding and how to properly instruct first time mothers how to correctly latch. Literature Review: Research shows that mothers do not continue breastfeeding after hospitalization due to lack of support and the lack of education on how to correctly breastfeed. There are many more benefits of breastfeeding compared to formula feeding the newborn. In a study that was taken, 25% of mothers are educated on breastfeeding, another 25% are partially educated and 50% are not educated. The inadequate knowledge and education on breastfeeding caused the mothers to go to formula-feeding. Methods: All women’s health nurses will be required to take a class taught by a lactation specialist on breastfeeding. The lactation specialist will educate the nurses how to correctly breastfeed, what will enhance the breast to produce more milk, and the benefits of breastfeeding a child. The nurses can relay the knowledge that they learned to educate mothers throughout and after their pregnancy on breastfeeding. Evaluation: Postpartum mothers will be asked multiple questions about how to breastfeed properly and will use the teach method to the nurse. They will also be asked questions about the benefits of breastfeeding to evaluate if they understand how important breastfeeding is for their child. The impact of the teachings will be measured by an increase in the numbers of mothers who are able to breastfeed and their knowledge.

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