Presenters

Emilei IsonFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Kristi Brannen

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Nurse burnout and retention is an ongoing issue in the trauma/surgery ICU, especially following COVID-19. Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) recently held a summit to address the issue of burnout among critical care professionals and call for action to implement change and promote research. Studies have shown that increased burnout amongst nurses is associated with increased healthcare associated infections, increased patient mortality, and decreased perceived quality of teamwork. With the cost of turnover being 1.2 to 1.3 times an RN’s salary, preventing burnout is a major issue for healthcare organizations. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project is to address nurse burnout, staff retention, and overall job satisfaction with monthly team debriefing sessions for nurses in a critical care unit. Studies have shown that debriefing sessions decrease nurses’ consideration of leaving their current positions. Nurses also felt more empowered to cope with their stress while feeling more supported by their organizations. These debriefing sessions will include education regarding burnout and how nurses can cope with stress while also opening a platform for nurses to discuss difficult cases and issues. The goal is to have other members of the interdisciplinary team join the sessions, but only nurses will be evaluated in this study. The effectiveness of these monthly team debriefing sessions for critical care nurses will be assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey for Medical Personnel (MBI-HSS(MP)) and evaluating nurse turnover and job satisfaction on the unit before and after the intervention is applied.

Disciplines

Critical Care Nursing | Medicine and Health Sciences | Nursing

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Monthly Debriefing Sessions for Critical Care Nurses: Evaluating Nurse Burnout and Retention

Nurse burnout and retention is an ongoing issue in the trauma/surgery ICU, especially following COVID-19. Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) recently held a summit to address the issue of burnout among critical care professionals and call for action to implement change and promote research. Studies have shown that increased burnout amongst nurses is associated with increased healthcare associated infections, increased patient mortality, and decreased perceived quality of teamwork. With the cost of turnover being 1.2 to 1.3 times an RN’s salary, preventing burnout is a major issue for healthcare organizations. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project is to address nurse burnout, staff retention, and overall job satisfaction with monthly team debriefing sessions for nurses in a critical care unit. Studies have shown that debriefing sessions decrease nurses’ consideration of leaving their current positions. Nurses also felt more empowered to cope with their stress while feeling more supported by their organizations. These debriefing sessions will include education regarding burnout and how nurses can cope with stress while also opening a platform for nurses to discuss difficult cases and issues. The goal is to have other members of the interdisciplinary team join the sessions, but only nurses will be evaluated in this study. The effectiveness of these monthly team debriefing sessions for critical care nurses will be assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey for Medical Personnel (MBI-HSS(MP)) and evaluating nurse turnover and job satisfaction on the unit before and after the intervention is applied.

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