Project Title

Options Against Opioids

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Mary Ramos

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Options Against Opioids

Background: Opioid use has been dramatically increasing over the years in the United States with an estimated 10.1 million people misused opioids in the past year. Many people have faced addiction, attempted to overcome their withdrawals, and the pressure to relapse. The United States has expanded its budget on opioid treatment programs and pharmacotherapy, but the relapses have increased which signals the increase in spending to prevent future opioid use. The purpose of this study is to compare pharmacotherapy and psychosocial treatment impact on rates of relapse. Method: The Johns Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model and Guidelines were used in the literature review, critical analysis, leveling of evidence, and quality rating. The PRISMA flow diagram was used to map out the number of records for inclusion and exclusion. CINAHL plus, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases were searched from 2017 to 2022. Results: The initial search yielded 131 articles. Following the removal of duplicates and screening, 24 articles were assessed for eligibility, and 9 studies were included for this review. There is a positive trend set in the recovery with the inclusion of psychosocial therapy reducing the relapse rates in adults with opioid use disorder. Conclusion: There is a greater impact of psychosocial therapy on relapse rates in relation to the implementation of pharmacotherapy in treatment programs.

Project Type

Poster

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Options Against Opioids

Options Against Opioids

Background: Opioid use has been dramatically increasing over the years in the United States with an estimated 10.1 million people misused opioids in the past year. Many people have faced addiction, attempted to overcome their withdrawals, and the pressure to relapse. The United States has expanded its budget on opioid treatment programs and pharmacotherapy, but the relapses have increased which signals the increase in spending to prevent future opioid use. The purpose of this study is to compare pharmacotherapy and psychosocial treatment impact on rates of relapse. Method: The Johns Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Model and Guidelines were used in the literature review, critical analysis, leveling of evidence, and quality rating. The PRISMA flow diagram was used to map out the number of records for inclusion and exclusion. CINAHL plus, PubMed, and MEDLINE databases were searched from 2017 to 2022. Results: The initial search yielded 131 articles. Following the removal of duplicates and screening, 24 articles were assessed for eligibility, and 9 studies were included for this review. There is a positive trend set in the recovery with the inclusion of psychosocial therapy reducing the relapse rates in adults with opioid use disorder. Conclusion: There is a greater impact of psychosocial therapy on relapse rates in relation to the implementation of pharmacotherapy in treatment programs.

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