Project Title

Are there changes in the coagulant dose jar test profile when pristine, weathered or lead laden microplastics are present?

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Marina Koether

Additional Faculty

Dr. Amy Gruss, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, agruss@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Microplastics have been found in several water sources, including potable water. These fragments are less than 5 millimeters in length and pose potential threats in the chain of consumption. Microplastic research is a growing field due to the increasing need for drinking water decontamination, so incorporating these fragments into jar tests can allow for a deeper understanding of the physicochemical properties that we can exploit for effective separation techniques. Jar tests are used in the water treatment industry to determine the optimum dosage to be used for coagulation and flocculation of colloids in incoming raw water at a water treatment plant. With the addition of pristine, weathered or lead laden microplastics, are there changes to the jar test profile at a given pH? This study is taking a systematic approach to answering this question.

Disciplines

Environmental Chemistry | Environmental Engineering

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Are there changes in the coagulant dose jar test profile when pristine, weathered or lead laden microplastics are present?

Microplastics have been found in several water sources, including potable water. These fragments are less than 5 millimeters in length and pose potential threats in the chain of consumption. Microplastic research is a growing field due to the increasing need for drinking water decontamination, so incorporating these fragments into jar tests can allow for a deeper understanding of the physicochemical properties that we can exploit for effective separation techniques. Jar tests are used in the water treatment industry to determine the optimum dosage to be used for coagulation and flocculation of colloids in incoming raw water at a water treatment plant. With the addition of pristine, weathered or lead laden microplastics, are there changes to the jar test profile at a given pH? This study is taking a systematic approach to answering this question.

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