Project Title

Gestational Weight Gain and Birth Weight: A Comparison by Maternal Race and Socioeconomic Status.

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Exercise Science and Sport Management

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Katherine Ingram

Additional Faculty

Dr. Sadaf Dabeer, Department of Endocrinology, Sadaf.dabeer@emory.edu Dr. Juliana F. Meireles, jfilguei@kennesaw.edu Dr. Janeen Amason, Wellstar School of Nursing, jamason1@kennesaw.edu Sophia Ramierez, Exercise Science and Sport Management, sramire7@students.kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Introduction: Socioeconomic status and race play a role in health of pregnancies. Racial disparities in maternal health have been reported and are linked to inequities in access to equitable prenatal health care. Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) can lead to gestational diabetes mellitus and childhood obesity in offspring. The objective of this research was to compare GWG and birthweight between socioeconomic status and maternal race groups.

Methods: Women (32.9±4.6 years, N=229) who had given birth in the past two years completed a Qualtrics survey in 2019. The survey included questions regarding socioeconomic status, race, age, GWG, and birthweight. Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests were performed.

Results: Of the participants, 75.11% were Non-Hispanic/White (NHW), and 24.89% were another race (other). Educationally, 5.20% had some college or below, 41.90% Bachelor’s or Associate's, 52.84% graduate degree. Economically, 16.44% made$100K. Birthweight was significantly higher for NHW when compared to others (3.48 kg±0.53 vs 3.08 kg±0.61, p=0.001). There was no difference in birthweight between educations (3.16kg±0.76 vs 3.41kg±0.58 vs 3.38kg±0.55) or between incomes (3.18kg±0.74 vs 3.34kg±0.57 vs 3.45kg±0.51). Similarly, there was no significant difference in GWG between races(13.13kg±6.12 vs 13.22kg±9.88), between educations (7.67kg±17.34 vs 12.64kg±6.34 vs 14.10kg±5.75), or between incomes (10.91kg±12.11 vs 13.25kg±6.27 vs 13.64kg±5.81).

Conclusion: Babies born to NHW women had higher birthweight than those of other races, even when no differences exist in GWG. Birthweight and GWG were similar across socioeconomic statuses. Racial and ethnic disparities exist in maternal health and must be considered by health care providers.

Disciplines

Biochemical Phenomena, Metabolism, and Nutrition | Physiological Processes | Reproductive and Urinary Physiology

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Gestational Weight Gain and Birth Weight: A Comparison by Maternal Race and Socioeconomic Status.

Introduction: Socioeconomic status and race play a role in health of pregnancies. Racial disparities in maternal health have been reported and are linked to inequities in access to equitable prenatal health care. Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) can lead to gestational diabetes mellitus and childhood obesity in offspring. The objective of this research was to compare GWG and birthweight between socioeconomic status and maternal race groups.

Methods: Women (32.9±4.6 years, N=229) who had given birth in the past two years completed a Qualtrics survey in 2019. The survey included questions regarding socioeconomic status, race, age, GWG, and birthweight. Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests were performed.

Results: Of the participants, 75.11% were Non-Hispanic/White (NHW), and 24.89% were another race (other). Educationally, 5.20% had some college or below, 41.90% Bachelor’s or Associate's, 52.84% graduate degree. Economically, 16.44% made$100K. Birthweight was significantly higher for NHW when compared to others (3.48 kg±0.53 vs 3.08 kg±0.61, p=0.001). There was no difference in birthweight between educations (3.16kg±0.76 vs 3.41kg±0.58 vs 3.38kg±0.55) or between incomes (3.18kg±0.74 vs 3.34kg±0.57 vs 3.45kg±0.51). Similarly, there was no significant difference in GWG between races(13.13kg±6.12 vs 13.22kg±9.88), between educations (7.67kg±17.34 vs 12.64kg±6.34 vs 14.10kg±5.75), or between incomes (10.91kg±12.11 vs 13.25kg±6.27 vs 13.64kg±5.81).

Conclusion: Babies born to NHW women had higher birthweight than those of other races, even when no differences exist in GWG. Birthweight and GWG were similar across socioeconomic statuses. Racial and ethnic disparities exist in maternal health and must be considered by health care providers.

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