Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Christie Emerson

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Title: Preventative Interventions to Support Decreasing Compassion Fatigue Among Critical Care Nurses

Background:

Nurses who are subjected to traumatic situations like difficult patient situations and a lack of support can experience compassion fatigue. Compassion fatigue is a problem throughout the healthcare field, especially in critical care where there are complex patients and high-pressure situations. Early forms of interventions such as workshops are important to offer in hopes of nurses becoming aware of and avoiding compassion fatigue.

Brief Literature Review:

This study aimed to synthesize existing interventions that focused on hospital nurses in a critical care capacity which focused on preventing compassion fatigue or increasing recognition, shown in monthly surveys. Effects of nurses in hospitals that are not supported, or address compassion fatigue have indicated a decrease in job satisfaction and an increase in compassion fatigue.

Project Methods:

A critical analysis for this study was obtained by reviewing workplace surveys, nursing journal databases, and interviewing current nurses. It was vital to establish baseline metrics prior to interventions among critical care nurses that focused on reducing or recognizing compassion fatigue. Once surveys were found as the key method for measuring satisfaction and fatigue among the nurses, it was important to include questions to report levels of satisfaction versus fatigue and recognizing compassion. The survey would be administered prior to and after attending a workshop for compassion fatigue.

Evaluation:

Eight weeks after attending a workshop on compassion fatigue, critical care nurses would complete another survey to rate their satisfaction of support, the workshop, and newfound signs of fatigue to compare with their primary survey. The goal would be a 15% decrease in reported compassion fatigue or increase of new awareness among critical care nurses before considering further interventions.

Keywords: Critical care nurses, Nursing Surveys, Workplace Satisfaction, Compassion fatigue, burnout, Workshops

Disciplines

Critical Care Nursing

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Preventative Interventions to Support Decreasing Compassion Fatigue Among Critical Care Nurses

Title: Preventative Interventions to Support Decreasing Compassion Fatigue Among Critical Care Nurses

Background:

Nurses who are subjected to traumatic situations like difficult patient situations and a lack of support can experience compassion fatigue. Compassion fatigue is a problem throughout the healthcare field, especially in critical care where there are complex patients and high-pressure situations. Early forms of interventions such as workshops are important to offer in hopes of nurses becoming aware of and avoiding compassion fatigue.

Brief Literature Review:

This study aimed to synthesize existing interventions that focused on hospital nurses in a critical care capacity which focused on preventing compassion fatigue or increasing recognition, shown in monthly surveys. Effects of nurses in hospitals that are not supported, or address compassion fatigue have indicated a decrease in job satisfaction and an increase in compassion fatigue.

Project Methods:

A critical analysis for this study was obtained by reviewing workplace surveys, nursing journal databases, and interviewing current nurses. It was vital to establish baseline metrics prior to interventions among critical care nurses that focused on reducing or recognizing compassion fatigue. Once surveys were found as the key method for measuring satisfaction and fatigue among the nurses, it was important to include questions to report levels of satisfaction versus fatigue and recognizing compassion. The survey would be administered prior to and after attending a workshop for compassion fatigue.

Evaluation:

Eight weeks after attending a workshop on compassion fatigue, critical care nurses would complete another survey to rate their satisfaction of support, the workshop, and newfound signs of fatigue to compare with their primary survey. The goal would be a 15% decrease in reported compassion fatigue or increase of new awareness among critical care nurses before considering further interventions.

Keywords: Critical care nurses, Nursing Surveys, Workplace Satisfaction, Compassion fatigue, burnout, Workshops

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