Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Psychological Science

Research Mentor Name

Dr. Katherine White

Additional Faculty

Dr. Ravi Ghadge, Sociology, rghadge@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

How Are You? A Comparison of Race-Related Emotions on a Predominantly White College Campus

Aisha Duck, Andrew Lord, Avery Britt, and Kaelyn Ireland

Racial tension displayed during the events of Summer 2020 demonstrated a need for further discourse on racism and its consequences. Although previous researchers have proposed models that outline discrimination-related stress’s impact on minority groups, these models typically lack details regarding specific emotional reactions to discriminatory incidents (Harrel, 2000; Kim, 2016). Thus, the current study aims to assess KSU’s students’ emotional reactions and coping mechanisms related to racism. For this presentation, there is a particular focus on comparing and contrasting the experiences of international, Asian, and Latinx students, as different approaches may be necessary to improve the racial climate for different ethnic groups. Data was collected from KSU students who participated in focus groups of 3-12 people based on racial or ethnic identity. A facilitator interviewed participants and asked them to share their race-related experiences on campus and in the community. Focus groups were professionally transcribed. Hour-long sessions were held virtually on Collaborate Ultra and ended with providing participants with resources for counseling or support. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and are in the process of being completed. Conclusions described in this study come from themes that emerged from careful analysis of the transcripts. Ultimately, results will be presented to Kennesaw State University administration, along with data-driven recommendations on how the university can improve the racial climate for students, faculty, and staff. Our findings will also be published publicly for use on other college campuses and to expand the existing research on race-related emotions and coping mechanisms.

Disciplines

Psychology | Sociology

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How Are You? A Comparison of Race-Related Emotions on a Predominantly White College Campus

How Are You? A Comparison of Race-Related Emotions on a Predominantly White College Campus

Aisha Duck, Andrew Lord, Avery Britt, and Kaelyn Ireland

Racial tension displayed during the events of Summer 2020 demonstrated a need for further discourse on racism and its consequences. Although previous researchers have proposed models that outline discrimination-related stress’s impact on minority groups, these models typically lack details regarding specific emotional reactions to discriminatory incidents (Harrel, 2000; Kim, 2016). Thus, the current study aims to assess KSU’s students’ emotional reactions and coping mechanisms related to racism. For this presentation, there is a particular focus on comparing and contrasting the experiences of international, Asian, and Latinx students, as different approaches may be necessary to improve the racial climate for different ethnic groups. Data was collected from KSU students who participated in focus groups of 3-12 people based on racial or ethnic identity. A facilitator interviewed participants and asked them to share their race-related experiences on campus and in the community. Focus groups were professionally transcribed. Hour-long sessions were held virtually on Collaborate Ultra and ended with providing participants with resources for counseling or support. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and are in the process of being completed. Conclusions described in this study come from themes that emerged from careful analysis of the transcripts. Ultimately, results will be presented to Kennesaw State University administration, along with data-driven recommendations on how the university can improve the racial climate for students, faculty, and staff. Our findings will also be published publicly for use on other college campuses and to expand the existing research on race-related emotions and coping mechanisms.

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