Project Title

Is there an association between physical activity during pregnancy and baby birth weight?

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Exercise Science and Sport Management

Faculty Sponsor Name

Katherine Ingram

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Physical activity during pregnancy has many benefits including reduced risk of excessive gestational weight gain, gestational diabetes, and postpartum depression. Previous studies have indicated that exercise during pregnancy leads to a reduced birthweight, but within a healthy range. However, some findings support the association between physical activity during pregnancy and baby birth weight while other studies have not found a significant relationship to support this association. The objective of this study is to determine the association between intensity and type of physical activity with baby weight at birth.

Twenty-six pregnant women (27± 4.49 years; BMI 31.58 ±7.74 kg/m; 69.2% Caucasian) completed the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ) at an approximate gestational age of 20 weeks. The PPAQ estimates total physical activity levels by scoring self-reported physical activity at different intensities (light, moderate, and vigorous) and various type (household, occupation, and sport). Normality test were used to determine data distribution. Spearman’s correlation tests were applied accordingly.

No significant correlations were found between birth weight and total activity (ρ= -0.114, p=0.58), sedentary activity (ρ=0.23, p=0.259), moderate activity (ρ= 0.041, p= 0.841), vigorous activity (ρ= -0.109, p= 0.598), household caregiving activity (ρ=-0.279, p= 0.167), occupational activity (ρ=0.147, p=0.473), and sports exercise (ρ=-0.248, p=0.222). A non-significant trend was found between birthweight and time in light activity (ρ=0.346, p=0.084).

Our findings indicate birth weight is not associated with daily activity during pregnancy. The relationship between intensities and type of physical activity and baby weight is not significant which aligns with results of previous studies. A limitation of this study was the small sample size therefore research involving the use of physical activity devices and a larger sample would be ideal. The study of these variables is relevant because it stresses the importance of effective physical activity programs during pregnancy to promote maternal and neonate health.

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Is there an association between physical activity during pregnancy and baby birth weight?

Physical activity during pregnancy has many benefits including reduced risk of excessive gestational weight gain, gestational diabetes, and postpartum depression. Previous studies have indicated that exercise during pregnancy leads to a reduced birthweight, but within a healthy range. However, some findings support the association between physical activity during pregnancy and baby birth weight while other studies have not found a significant relationship to support this association. The objective of this study is to determine the association between intensity and type of physical activity with baby weight at birth.

Twenty-six pregnant women (27± 4.49 years; BMI 31.58 ±7.74 kg/m; 69.2% Caucasian) completed the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ) at an approximate gestational age of 20 weeks. The PPAQ estimates total physical activity levels by scoring self-reported physical activity at different intensities (light, moderate, and vigorous) and various type (household, occupation, and sport). Normality test were used to determine data distribution. Spearman’s correlation tests were applied accordingly.

No significant correlations were found between birth weight and total activity (ρ= -0.114, p=0.58), sedentary activity (ρ=0.23, p=0.259), moderate activity (ρ= 0.041, p= 0.841), vigorous activity (ρ= -0.109, p= 0.598), household caregiving activity (ρ=-0.279, p= 0.167), occupational activity (ρ=0.147, p=0.473), and sports exercise (ρ=-0.248, p=0.222). A non-significant trend was found between birthweight and time in light activity (ρ=0.346, p=0.084).

Our findings indicate birth weight is not associated with daily activity during pregnancy. The relationship between intensities and type of physical activity and baby weight is not significant which aligns with results of previous studies. A limitation of this study was the small sample size therefore research involving the use of physical activity devices and a larger sample would be ideal. The study of these variables is relevant because it stresses the importance of effective physical activity programs during pregnancy to promote maternal and neonate health.

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