Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Karen Armstrong

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: Research suggests that early interventions may reduce negative outcomes from postpartum depression (PPD). It is well established that PPD creates negative outcomes regarding maternal healing and fetal growth. Objective: We sought to investigate whether screening tools or therapies are more effective for preventing postpartum depression (PPD), a mental illness, which research suggests often hinders maternal healing and the child’s growth. Method: We performed a systematic review and thorough evaluation of 291 studies. Results: Screening tools highlighted increased weight, lack of emotional regulation, low social support, the transition to parenthood, lack of screening, having low-income, and missed diagnoses as contributing factors to an increased risk for PPD. We also looked at studies that used pharmacologic therapies, finding vitamin B6, transdermal estradiol, SSRIs and SNRIs effective. Conclusion: Education and nursing interventions such as destigmatizing the emotions behind PPD, assessing the need to be diagnosed and mother- baby bonding, and encouraging nonpharmacologic therapies including support group attendance can all be effective in preventing postpartum depression. We found that it is beneficial to use screening tools and a variety of therapy techniques to prevent PPD.

Disciplines

Family Practice Nursing | Maternal, Child Health and Neonatal Nursing

Project Type

Event

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Impact of Postpartum Depression Screening Tools versus Therapy

Background: Research suggests that early interventions may reduce negative outcomes from postpartum depression (PPD). It is well established that PPD creates negative outcomes regarding maternal healing and fetal growth. Objective: We sought to investigate whether screening tools or therapies are more effective for preventing postpartum depression (PPD), a mental illness, which research suggests often hinders maternal healing and the child’s growth. Method: We performed a systematic review and thorough evaluation of 291 studies. Results: Screening tools highlighted increased weight, lack of emotional regulation, low social support, the transition to parenthood, lack of screening, having low-income, and missed diagnoses as contributing factors to an increased risk for PPD. We also looked at studies that used pharmacologic therapies, finding vitamin B6, transdermal estradiol, SSRIs and SNRIs effective. Conclusion: Education and nursing interventions such as destigmatizing the emotions behind PPD, assessing the need to be diagnosed and mother- baby bonding, and encouraging nonpharmacologic therapies including support group attendance can all be effective in preventing postpartum depression. We found that it is beneficial to use screening tools and a variety of therapy techniques to prevent PPD.

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