Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Doreen Wagner

Abstract (300 words maximum)

In the United States, one in 25 pregnant women suffer from eclampsia. Preeclampsia is a condition defined by new onset gestational high blood pressure often coupled with sudden swelling of the extremities and headaches and can rapidly worsen to an acute eclampsia situation. The transition to eclampsia is often seen in the third trimester of pregnancy, when the patient will experience more severe symptoms like seizures and other neurological changes. Internationally, maternal death rates related to eclampsia are widely varied among different nations and there are discrepancies as to best treatment practices. The focus of this systematic literature review is to determine if women receiving perinatal care in the United States decreases the risk of maternal death related to eclampsia compared to receiving perinatal care in other developed countries? A Prisma Flow Diagram will visually summarize the screening process taken that spans multiple databases including CINAHL, PubMed, Complementary Index, and MEDLINE Complete. Inclusion criteria are publications from 2016-2022, eclampsia treatment practices, domestic and international guidelines, and articles in English. Articles not published within the last five years are excluded. Keywords included preeclampsia, eclampsia, maternal death, and prenatal care. Preliminary findings indicate a difference in maternal mortality rates resulting from eclampsia in the United States compared to rates in other developed countries. Final results will be presented at the Symposium. Results derived from this inquiry could potentially identify gaps in perinatal care in the United States healthcare system that increases maternal death rates.

Keywords: eclampsia, preeclampsia, maternal mortality rate, United States, hypertension, prenatal, perinatal, best practice standards, international guidelines

Disciplines

Maternal, Child Health and Neonatal Nursing

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Comparison of Domestic and International Practice Standards for Treating Eclampsia

In the United States, one in 25 pregnant women suffer from eclampsia. Preeclampsia is a condition defined by new onset gestational high blood pressure often coupled with sudden swelling of the extremities and headaches and can rapidly worsen to an acute eclampsia situation. The transition to eclampsia is often seen in the third trimester of pregnancy, when the patient will experience more severe symptoms like seizures and other neurological changes. Internationally, maternal death rates related to eclampsia are widely varied among different nations and there are discrepancies as to best treatment practices. The focus of this systematic literature review is to determine if women receiving perinatal care in the United States decreases the risk of maternal death related to eclampsia compared to receiving perinatal care in other developed countries? A Prisma Flow Diagram will visually summarize the screening process taken that spans multiple databases including CINAHL, PubMed, Complementary Index, and MEDLINE Complete. Inclusion criteria are publications from 2016-2022, eclampsia treatment practices, domestic and international guidelines, and articles in English. Articles not published within the last five years are excluded. Keywords included preeclampsia, eclampsia, maternal death, and prenatal care. Preliminary findings indicate a difference in maternal mortality rates resulting from eclampsia in the United States compared to rates in other developed countries. Final results will be presented at the Symposium. Results derived from this inquiry could potentially identify gaps in perinatal care in the United States healthcare system that increases maternal death rates.

Keywords: eclampsia, preeclampsia, maternal mortality rate, United States, hypertension, prenatal, perinatal, best practice standards, international guidelines

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