Project Title

How Has COVID-19 Impacted Campus Return and Related Anxieties of College Students?

Presenters

ROGER OTWAYFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Psychological Science

Faculty Sponsor Name

Tyler Collette

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The COVID-19 pandemic introduced a host of new and persistent stressors in our daily lives. Anxiety related to such lifestyle changes has focused extensively on work (Gomez et al., 2020), parenting (Brown et al., 2020), healthcare workers (Bohlken et al., 2020), and burnout (Yildirim et al., 2020). However, while some studies focus on college student’s state-level anxiety regarding the effects and lifestyle changes associated with COVID-19 (Biber et al., 2020; Ardan et al., 2020; Ma & Miller, 2021), many rely on non-US students, evaluate anxieties specific to students’ own circumstances, or emphasize fear without anxiety. No study to date has examined the effect of COVID-19 related fears or concerns regarding the return to campus in relation to the state-level anxiety of college students in the United States.

The focus of the current study is on the effects of COVID-19 on campus return fears and the relationship between those fears and state-level anxiety. The purpose is to establish demographic differences in concern for returning to campus and evaluate the statistical relationship between those concerns and state-level anxiety

A sample (N=377) of college students was collected from southern universities. Each student volunteered participation before answering demographic questions and completing a survey that assessed COVID-19 concerns and state-level anxiety.

Descriptive statistics were conducted to evaluate differences in concern for returning to campus. bivariate Pearson’s correlations were conducted to evaluate the relationship between COVID-19 concerns to return to campus and anxiety. Results show a clear positive relationship between COVID-19 related concerns and state-level anxiety.

KEYWORDS: COVID-19, anxiety, college students

Disciplines

Psychology

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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How Has COVID-19 Impacted Campus Return and Related Anxieties of College Students?

The COVID-19 pandemic introduced a host of new and persistent stressors in our daily lives. Anxiety related to such lifestyle changes has focused extensively on work (Gomez et al., 2020), parenting (Brown et al., 2020), healthcare workers (Bohlken et al., 2020), and burnout (Yildirim et al., 2020). However, while some studies focus on college student’s state-level anxiety regarding the effects and lifestyle changes associated with COVID-19 (Biber et al., 2020; Ardan et al., 2020; Ma & Miller, 2021), many rely on non-US students, evaluate anxieties specific to students’ own circumstances, or emphasize fear without anxiety. No study to date has examined the effect of COVID-19 related fears or concerns regarding the return to campus in relation to the state-level anxiety of college students in the United States.

The focus of the current study is on the effects of COVID-19 on campus return fears and the relationship between those fears and state-level anxiety. The purpose is to establish demographic differences in concern for returning to campus and evaluate the statistical relationship between those concerns and state-level anxiety

A sample (N=377) of college students was collected from southern universities. Each student volunteered participation before answering demographic questions and completing a survey that assessed COVID-19 concerns and state-level anxiety.

Descriptive statistics were conducted to evaluate differences in concern for returning to campus. bivariate Pearson’s correlations were conducted to evaluate the relationship between COVID-19 concerns to return to campus and anxiety. Results show a clear positive relationship between COVID-19 related concerns and state-level anxiety.

KEYWORDS: COVID-19, anxiety, college students

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