Presenters

Jonathan YunFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Physics

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Kisa Ranasinghe

Additional Faculty

Rajnish Singh, Chemistry, rsingh@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Multivalent cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) were synthesized by doping a borate glass composition with various amounts of cerium(IV) oxide (CeO2) and melting at 1100˚C. During the melt, the CeO2 undergoes a solid-state reaction, which forms crystals of cerium(III) oxide(Ce3+) and cerium(IV) oxides(Ce4+). Nanoceria is of interest due to its ability to coexist in and cycle between cerium(III) oxide and cerium(IV) oxide forms, as this enables an oxygen-capturing effect with a wide range of potential biomedical applications, utilizing regenerative, antioxidant, and wound healing properties. This study serves to provide insight on the nanoceria of doped bioactive borate glass through Raman spectroscopy analysis. Testing was done through cycles of sample generation and analysis, where, after generation, samples are then ground into a fine powder and studied via a BWTek Raman spectroscopy machine using 785nm laser and tested for varying CeO2 concentrations to analyze the oxidation and reduction of the dopant, as a function of concentration.

Disciplines

Materials Chemistry

Project Type

Poster

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Raman Spectroscopy Analysis of the Nanoceria Synthesized Using Soluble Glass

Multivalent cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) were synthesized by doping a borate glass composition with various amounts of cerium(IV) oxide (CeO2) and melting at 1100˚C. During the melt, the CeO2 undergoes a solid-state reaction, which forms crystals of cerium(III) oxide(Ce3+) and cerium(IV) oxides(Ce4+). Nanoceria is of interest due to its ability to coexist in and cycle between cerium(III) oxide and cerium(IV) oxide forms, as this enables an oxygen-capturing effect with a wide range of potential biomedical applications, utilizing regenerative, antioxidant, and wound healing properties. This study serves to provide insight on the nanoceria of doped bioactive borate glass through Raman spectroscopy analysis. Testing was done through cycles of sample generation and analysis, where, after generation, samples are then ground into a fine powder and studied via a BWTek Raman spectroscopy machine using 785nm laser and tested for varying CeO2 concentrations to analyze the oxidation and reduction of the dopant, as a function of concentration.

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