Project Title

Lived-Experiences of African American Family Caregivers of Patients with Dementia

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Mary Ramos

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Lived-Experiences of African American Family Caregivers of Patients with Dementia

Abstract

Objective: African Americans are more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD), and the number of their family caregivers will rapidly grow over the next 20 years. The purpose of this study was to investigate the caregiver experience of African American women while taking care of family members with ADRD.

Methods: An interpretative phenomenology design was used in this research study to provide an in-depth understanding of African American women’s experiences in caregiving for family with ADRD.

Results: All participants were African American married women, with ages ranging from 63 to 81 years (M=70.3, SD=7.8). Three of the participants are taking care of their husbands, while two of them are taking care of their fathers. Three of them are still working as frontline workers while two of the participants are already retired. Themes emerged (a) family care obligation, (b) caregiving journey, (c) prioritizing health issues, (d) coping behavior, and (e) support needs and challenges.

Conclusion: Family caregivers need continuous support, knowledge, and guidance. Implications for nursing include emphasis on family assessment, education and awareness, and collaboration with interdisciplinary teams to provide optimal resources.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Lived-Experiences of African American Family Caregivers of Patients with Dementia

Lived-Experiences of African American Family Caregivers of Patients with Dementia

Abstract

Objective: African Americans are more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD), and the number of their family caregivers will rapidly grow over the next 20 years. The purpose of this study was to investigate the caregiver experience of African American women while taking care of family members with ADRD.

Methods: An interpretative phenomenology design was used in this research study to provide an in-depth understanding of African American women’s experiences in caregiving for family with ADRD.

Results: All participants were African American married women, with ages ranging from 63 to 81 years (M=70.3, SD=7.8). Three of the participants are taking care of their husbands, while two of them are taking care of their fathers. Three of them are still working as frontline workers while two of the participants are already retired. Themes emerged (a) family care obligation, (b) caregiving journey, (c) prioritizing health issues, (d) coping behavior, and (e) support needs and challenges.

Conclusion: Family caregivers need continuous support, knowledge, and guidance. Implications for nursing include emphasis on family assessment, education and awareness, and collaboration with interdisciplinary teams to provide optimal resources.

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