Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Molecular and Cellular Biology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Christopher Cornelison

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Brewer’s yeast, also known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is the yeast most brewers and beer enthusiasts know. Hops, grain, and adjuncts are commonly known to give beer distinct flavors, but the yeast species that are pitched can promote distinct aromatic profiles. Non-conventional yeast strains and their integration in beer is a new phenomenon being practiced in the brewing industry, and their unique characteristics are still largely unknown.

This study focuses on applying non-conventional yeast strains and the effects on the sensory and aromatic characteristics of the beer. Ten strains of yeast were analyzed in a base beer wort of a Saison, a pale ale originating from the farmhouses of Wallonia in Belgium, to determine the sensory characteristic produced from each individual strain. The base wort was segmented into ten individual fermenters and inoculated with both the non-conventional yeast strains and Saccharomyces cerevisiae concurrently. Each fermenter was regulated at room temperature covered to reduce light exposure for 12 days. Sensory analysis was conducted using the methodology from the American Society of Brewing Chemists. The original gravity and final gravity of each brew were taken to determine differences in alcohol content. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was also used as an analytical method to determine the unique compounds produced from the yeast strains.

By researching the role these non-conventional yeast strains have when paired sequentially with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, distinct sensory characteristics were observed. Utilizing non-conventional yeast strains can produce unique brews that have yet to be discovered.

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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Assessment of Non-Saccharomyces Yeast Species as Co-Fermenters in Saison-Style Beer

Brewer’s yeast, also known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is the yeast most brewers and beer enthusiasts know. Hops, grain, and adjuncts are commonly known to give beer distinct flavors, but the yeast species that are pitched can promote distinct aromatic profiles. Non-conventional yeast strains and their integration in beer is a new phenomenon being practiced in the brewing industry, and their unique characteristics are still largely unknown.

This study focuses on applying non-conventional yeast strains and the effects on the sensory and aromatic characteristics of the beer. Ten strains of yeast were analyzed in a base beer wort of a Saison, a pale ale originating from the farmhouses of Wallonia in Belgium, to determine the sensory characteristic produced from each individual strain. The base wort was segmented into ten individual fermenters and inoculated with both the non-conventional yeast strains and Saccharomyces cerevisiae concurrently. Each fermenter was regulated at room temperature covered to reduce light exposure for 12 days. Sensory analysis was conducted using the methodology from the American Society of Brewing Chemists. The original gravity and final gravity of each brew were taken to determine differences in alcohol content. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was also used as an analytical method to determine the unique compounds produced from the yeast strains.

By researching the role these non-conventional yeast strains have when paired sequentially with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, distinct sensory characteristics were observed. Utilizing non-conventional yeast strains can produce unique brews that have yet to be discovered.

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