Project Title

Impact of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder among Veterans: A Systematic Review

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Mary Ramos

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common side effects among patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and interventions have only been moderately successful in reducing these side effects. Determining the most effective intervention to help veterans cope with symptoms pertaining to PTSD need to be identified. Methods: A systematic review of literature was conducted to answer the question “In veterans with PTSD, how does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) compare to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) drug therapy influence anxiety and depressive symptoms?” Search of the bibliographic databases EBSCOHost, Cochrane, and PubMed were used to identify studies published between 2015-2020 that studied the progression of PTSD specifically in veterans and the benefits of CBT and SSRI. Results: There are evidence to support the impact of CBT and SSRI to the veteran’s quality of life and the reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Conclusion: Patient centered therapy (PCT), a type of CBT was found to be more effective than basic CBT.

Project Type

Event

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Impact of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder among Veterans: A Systematic Review

Background: Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common side effects among patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and interventions have only been moderately successful in reducing these side effects. Determining the most effective intervention to help veterans cope with symptoms pertaining to PTSD need to be identified. Methods: A systematic review of literature was conducted to answer the question “In veterans with PTSD, how does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) compare to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) drug therapy influence anxiety and depressive symptoms?” Search of the bibliographic databases EBSCOHost, Cochrane, and PubMed were used to identify studies published between 2015-2020 that studied the progression of PTSD specifically in veterans and the benefits of CBT and SSRI. Results: There are evidence to support the impact of CBT and SSRI to the veteran’s quality of life and the reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Conclusion: Patient centered therapy (PCT), a type of CBT was found to be more effective than basic CBT.