Project Title

Improving Social Responsibility in a Young Adult with Bipolar Disorder through Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Medication Compliance

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Social Work & Human Services

Faculty Sponsor Name

James B. Stinchcomb, MSW, MPA, HS-BCP, CNP

no human subjects

Project Type

Event

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Through a social work clinical perspective, working with individuals who have been noncompliant with therapy and regularly taking medication as prescribed can lead to a serious inability to function day to day in society. This single case study design focuses on an individual with Bipolar Disorder who is struggling to reacclimate after being diagnosed. It’s important to note the client in this case study is based on a fictional character. All results are based on best practices and situations of real cases with someone who complies with given interventions. Bipolar Disorder (BP) is a fairly common, lifelong mental illness that causes a shift in mood, energy, and daily function; 1 in every 100 people will be diagnosed with BP at some point in their lifespan. BP I includes severe manic and depressive episodes, whereas BP-II includes alternating depressive and manic episodes that are less severe. Recent literature suggests that clients should receive medication supplements and psychoeducation to combat the symptoms of BP. Using evidence-based best practices, this study focuses on a biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment (BPSS) conducted with a 27 year-old-female diagnosed with BP I who has trouble maintaining employment. After meeting with the client, it was hypothesized that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) combined with a thorough medication treatment plan will help to stabilize the client’s BP. This was measured by the client’s journaling, mood scale, and medication app. The results showed that CBT along with compliance to medication allowed the client’s mood to stabilize thus sustain employment.

Keywords: Bipolar Disorder, Biopsychosocial-Spiritual Assessment, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Medication Treatment Plan

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Improving Social Responsibility in a Young Adult with Bipolar Disorder through Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Medication Compliance

Through a social work clinical perspective, working with individuals who have been noncompliant with therapy and regularly taking medication as prescribed can lead to a serious inability to function day to day in society. This single case study design focuses on an individual with Bipolar Disorder who is struggling to reacclimate after being diagnosed. It’s important to note the client in this case study is based on a fictional character. All results are based on best practices and situations of real cases with someone who complies with given interventions. Bipolar Disorder (BP) is a fairly common, lifelong mental illness that causes a shift in mood, energy, and daily function; 1 in every 100 people will be diagnosed with BP at some point in their lifespan. BP I includes severe manic and depressive episodes, whereas BP-II includes alternating depressive and manic episodes that are less severe. Recent literature suggests that clients should receive medication supplements and psychoeducation to combat the symptoms of BP. Using evidence-based best practices, this study focuses on a biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment (BPSS) conducted with a 27 year-old-female diagnosed with BP I who has trouble maintaining employment. After meeting with the client, it was hypothesized that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) combined with a thorough medication treatment plan will help to stabilize the client’s BP. This was measured by the client’s journaling, mood scale, and medication app. The results showed that CBT along with compliance to medication allowed the client’s mood to stabilize thus sustain employment.

Keywords: Bipolar Disorder, Biopsychosocial-Spiritual Assessment, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Medication Treatment Plan