Project Title

Exercise Level during Pregnancy, Gestational Diabetes and Baby Birthweight: A Quantitative Retrospective Study

Presenters

Haley WrightFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Exercise Science & Sports Management

Faculty Sponsor Name

Katherine H. Ingram

Additional Faculty

Janeen Amason, Exercise Science & Sports Management, jamason1@kennesaw.edu

Juliana Filgueiras Meireles, Exercise Science & Sports Management, jfilguei@kennesaw.edu

Nicole Carlson Emory University, Emory University School of Nursing, nicole.carlson@emory.edu

Project Type

Event

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a cardio-metabolic health condition found in 2-10% of pregnancies in the United States each year. This condition can lead to an increase risk of gestational preeclampsia and future type 2 diabetes in mothers. GDM also increases the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in offspring. Studies showed that exercise reduces the risk of GDM and stimulates healthy growth for the fetus.

Objective: This study aims to evaluate the relationship among exercise level during pregnancy, GDM and birthweight.

Methods: A survey was shared through social media with women who have given birth within the past two years. Participants were asked to share information regarding their pregnancy exercise frequency and intensity, health conditions such as GDM, and birthweight. Data was analyzed by SPSS 27.0, and bivariate statistical analyses were performed.

Results: Women (n=240) were between the ages 22-47 (Average = 32.99± 4.63) and 6.25% (n=15) were diagnosed with GDM. The average birthweight for the GDM group was 3.14 ±0.43 kg, and the average birthweight among the non-GDM group was 3.18 ±0.59 kg. Of the women with GDM, 77.33% (n=11) reported exercise during pregnancy, while 26.67% (n=4) of these women reported no exercise. 82.22% (n=185) of women without GDM reported exercise during pregnancy, and 17.77% (n=40) reported no exercise. No correlation was found between exercise level during pregnancy and birthweight (r=-0.56, p=0.464). Exercise level during pregnancy and GDM also presented no significant differences (U=737.00, p=0.533).

Conclusion Our study shows limited evidence that self-reported exercise is associated with reduced risk for GDM. However, other studies have shown a benefit of exercise on risk for GDM. These conflicting findings confirm that more research is needed to better understand influences of exercise during pregnancy on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Exercise Level during Pregnancy, Gestational Diabetes and Baby Birthweight: A Quantitative Retrospective Study

Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a cardio-metabolic health condition found in 2-10% of pregnancies in the United States each year. This condition can lead to an increase risk of gestational preeclampsia and future type 2 diabetes in mothers. GDM also increases the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in offspring. Studies showed that exercise reduces the risk of GDM and stimulates healthy growth for the fetus.

Objective: This study aims to evaluate the relationship among exercise level during pregnancy, GDM and birthweight.

Methods: A survey was shared through social media with women who have given birth within the past two years. Participants were asked to share information regarding their pregnancy exercise frequency and intensity, health conditions such as GDM, and birthweight. Data was analyzed by SPSS 27.0, and bivariate statistical analyses were performed.

Results: Women (n=240) were between the ages 22-47 (Average = 32.99± 4.63) and 6.25% (n=15) were diagnosed with GDM. The average birthweight for the GDM group was 3.14 ±0.43 kg, and the average birthweight among the non-GDM group was 3.18 ±0.59 kg. Of the women with GDM, 77.33% (n=11) reported exercise during pregnancy, while 26.67% (n=4) of these women reported no exercise. 82.22% (n=185) of women without GDM reported exercise during pregnancy, and 17.77% (n=40) reported no exercise. No correlation was found between exercise level during pregnancy and birthweight (r=-0.56, p=0.464). Exercise level during pregnancy and GDM also presented no significant differences (U=737.00, p=0.533).

Conclusion Our study shows limited evidence that self-reported exercise is associated with reduced risk for GDM. However, other studies have shown a benefit of exercise on risk for GDM. These conflicting findings confirm that more research is needed to better understand influences of exercise during pregnancy on maternal and neonatal outcomes.