Project Title

How AWC neuron defects affect volatile chemotaxis in C. elegans

Presenters

Barrett UptonFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Molecular and Cellular Biology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Martin Hudson

Additional Faculty

Karuna Kalichamy, Molecular and Cellular Biology, kkalicha@kennesaw.edu

no human subjects

Abstract (300 words maximum)

C. elegans are known for having highly developed chemosensory systems. This enables them to be able to detect volatile and water-soluble cues. A big part of their nervous system is dedicated to recognizing environmental cues such as food, danger, or other animals. The C. elegans species has many primary sensory neurons, and in this study, we looked into the volatile(olfactory) function of the AWC neuron and how it relates to the navigation function of the AIY neuron. There was a chemotaxis analysis done with 5 strains. These strains included vab-1, vab-2, efn-4, tax-2, and N2. The chemotaxis looks to demonstrate experimental data performed with ethanol as the control and benzaldehyde, isoamyl alcohol, and butanone as experimental groups.

Project Type

Event

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How AWC neuron defects affect volatile chemotaxis in C. elegans

C. elegans are known for having highly developed chemosensory systems. This enables them to be able to detect volatile and water-soluble cues. A big part of their nervous system is dedicated to recognizing environmental cues such as food, danger, or other animals. The C. elegans species has many primary sensory neurons, and in this study, we looked into the volatile(olfactory) function of the AWC neuron and how it relates to the navigation function of the AIY neuron. There was a chemotaxis analysis done with 5 strains. These strains included vab-1, vab-2, efn-4, tax-2, and N2. The chemotaxis looks to demonstrate experimental data performed with ethanol as the control and benzaldehyde, isoamyl alcohol, and butanone as experimental groups.