Project Title

The Relationship Between Self-Reported Exercise Prior to Pregnancy, GDM, and Neonatal Birth Weight

Presenters

Maria JohnsonFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Exercise Science & Sports Management

Faculty Sponsor Name

Katherine Ingram

Project Type

Event

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Title: The Relationship Between Self-Reported Exercise Prior to Pregnancy, GDM, and Neonatal Birth Weight

Authors: Maria Johnson1, Raine Morris2, Juliana Meireles2, Ph.D., Janeen Amason3, RN, PhD, Katherine H. Ingram2, Ph.D.

Institution: Departments of Biology1, Exercise Science and Sport Management2, and WellStar School of Nursing3 at Kennesaw State University

Background: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is associated with an excessive infant birth weight, and sedentary women are at a higher risk for GDM. The objective of this project is to assess the relationship between exercise prior to pregnancy, GDM, and neonatal weight.

Methods: Through social media, women with children ages two years or less were recruited to answer an online questionnaire regarding physical exercise prior to pregnancy based on frequency (none, occasionally, few times a week, or most days of the week) and intensity (high, moderate and light). GDM diagnosis during pregnancy was self-reported. An exercise intensity score was calculated using the following formula: the high intensity is multiplied by 3, moderate intensity by 2 factor and light intensity by 1, then summed together. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed to verify the correlation using SPSS 27.0.

Results: Women (n=240) aged 22 to 47 years (M= 32.99±4.63) with 6.2% indicating a GDM diagnosis (n=15). The average birthweight for the GDM group was 3.14±0.43kg, and the birthweight for the non-GDM group was 3.18±0.59kg. There was no correlation between exercise before pregnancy and birth weight (ρ=0.06, p=0.370). Out of the 15 women with GDM, 12 (80%) exercised prior to pregnancy while 3(20%) women did not exercise. Of the women without GDM, 91.55% (n=206) reported exercise prior pregnancy, while 8.45% (n=19) of these women reported no exercise There was no significant difference between exercise prior to pregnancy and GDM (U=960.5, p=0.755).

Conclusion: No significant differences were found between the self-reported level of physical exercise prior to pregnancy between women with and without GDM. In addition, the level of exercise was not correlated with birth weight. Although our data does not demonstrate a correlation between self-reported exercise levels prior to pregnancy and GDM, it is well-established that exercise is an important factor for a healthy pregnancy.

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The Relationship Between Self-Reported Exercise Prior to Pregnancy, GDM, and Neonatal Birth Weight

Title: The Relationship Between Self-Reported Exercise Prior to Pregnancy, GDM, and Neonatal Birth Weight

Authors: Maria Johnson1, Raine Morris2, Juliana Meireles2, Ph.D., Janeen Amason3, RN, PhD, Katherine H. Ingram2, Ph.D.

Institution: Departments of Biology1, Exercise Science and Sport Management2, and WellStar School of Nursing3 at Kennesaw State University

Background: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is associated with an excessive infant birth weight, and sedentary women are at a higher risk for GDM. The objective of this project is to assess the relationship between exercise prior to pregnancy, GDM, and neonatal weight.

Methods: Through social media, women with children ages two years or less were recruited to answer an online questionnaire regarding physical exercise prior to pregnancy based on frequency (none, occasionally, few times a week, or most days of the week) and intensity (high, moderate and light). GDM diagnosis during pregnancy was self-reported. An exercise intensity score was calculated using the following formula: the high intensity is multiplied by 3, moderate intensity by 2 factor and light intensity by 1, then summed together. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed to verify the correlation using SPSS 27.0.

Results: Women (n=240) aged 22 to 47 years (M= 32.99±4.63) with 6.2% indicating a GDM diagnosis (n=15). The average birthweight for the GDM group was 3.14±0.43kg, and the birthweight for the non-GDM group was 3.18±0.59kg. There was no correlation between exercise before pregnancy and birth weight (ρ=0.06, p=0.370). Out of the 15 women with GDM, 12 (80%) exercised prior to pregnancy while 3(20%) women did not exercise. Of the women without GDM, 91.55% (n=206) reported exercise prior pregnancy, while 8.45% (n=19) of these women reported no exercise There was no significant difference between exercise prior to pregnancy and GDM (U=960.5, p=0.755).

Conclusion: No significant differences were found between the self-reported level of physical exercise prior to pregnancy between women with and without GDM. In addition, the level of exercise was not correlated with birth weight. Although our data does not demonstrate a correlation between self-reported exercise levels prior to pregnancy and GDM, it is well-established that exercise is an important factor for a healthy pregnancy.