Project Title

Pain Management During Chest Tube Removal in Cardiac Post-op Patients

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Mary Dioise Ramos

This research is part of the nursing research class and has been approved by the sponsor. It is a systematic literature review.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: Chest tube insertion, or chest tube thoracostomy, is a medical procedure performed to remove air, blood, or fluid from the pleural cavity to restore lung function. Chest tube removal generally takes place within 24 to 48 hours postoperatively while the patient is conscious; thus, making it a relatively painful experience. Due to a lack of evidence, few known procedures effectively manage pain associated with chest tube removal. Objective: This study aims to explore and analyze existing research related to pain management, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods during chest tube removal, in post-operative cardiac patients to institute new and effective methods into current medical practice. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted to obtain relative data guided by a PICOT question and organized using a PRISMA flow chart and a search strategy technique. A total of 150 articles were narrowed down to five articles, each related to pain management of chest tube removal and were conducted within the past five years. Conclusion: Interventions including continuing education of nurses, cryotherapy, music therapy, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, and therapeutic nerve blocks may contribute to or have an adjuvant role in alleviating pain associated with chest tube removal.

Project Type

Event

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Pain Management During Chest Tube Removal in Cardiac Post-op Patients

Background: Chest tube insertion, or chest tube thoracostomy, is a medical procedure performed to remove air, blood, or fluid from the pleural cavity to restore lung function. Chest tube removal generally takes place within 24 to 48 hours postoperatively while the patient is conscious; thus, making it a relatively painful experience. Due to a lack of evidence, few known procedures effectively manage pain associated with chest tube removal. Objective: This study aims to explore and analyze existing research related to pain management, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods during chest tube removal, in post-operative cardiac patients to institute new and effective methods into current medical practice. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted to obtain relative data guided by a PICOT question and organized using a PRISMA flow chart and a search strategy technique. A total of 150 articles were narrowed down to five articles, each related to pain management of chest tube removal and were conducted within the past five years. Conclusion: Interventions including continuing education of nurses, cryotherapy, music therapy, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, and therapeutic nerve blocks may contribute to or have an adjuvant role in alleviating pain associated with chest tube removal.