Project Title

Simulations of Design and Function of Cosmic Ray Muon Detector for Muography,

Presenters

Kenzi waddellFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Physics

Faculty Sponsor Name

David Joffe

Additional Faculty

Kevin Stokes, Physics, kevin.stokes@kennesaw.edu

We are not using human or animal subjects.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The purpose of this project is to construct an inexpensive and easily portable ionization-type detector built from a series of parallel plate capacitors filled with air (at standard temperature and pressure) and held at low voltage. The detector will be used for muography, an archeological technique that allows for the mapping of the inside of large solid structures or natural formations without disturbing them. This is accomplished by using a detector to determine the rate of cosmic-ray muon absorption of the object. A traditional muon detector, such as a cloud chamber or wire chamber, is difficult and expensive to develop and maintain in the field. They require high voltage (~2000V) and complex gas systems to maintain the correct ionization current. A simplified series of air-filled parallel-plate detectors are would be more functional. Some low voltage versions of the parallel-plate detectors have been constructed, and without any signal amplification they can detect currents from micro-curie alpha and beta emitting sources. Amplification is being added to the detectors to achieve enough sensitivity to detect cosmic-ray muons. Simulations have been run in LT Spice to determine the best amplification circuit for the detector. GEANT 4 simulations have also been utilized to discover the energy range required to detect the most cosmic-ray muons. Additionally, a purely theoretical integral has been coded and solved using Fortran to discover the theoretical energy range. Using the improved amplification electronics and the findings from the preliminary simulations of detector use, the device is expected to function as designed.

Project Type

Event

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Simulations of Design and Function of Cosmic Ray Muon Detector for Muography,

The purpose of this project is to construct an inexpensive and easily portable ionization-type detector built from a series of parallel plate capacitors filled with air (at standard temperature and pressure) and held at low voltage. The detector will be used for muography, an archeological technique that allows for the mapping of the inside of large solid structures or natural formations without disturbing them. This is accomplished by using a detector to determine the rate of cosmic-ray muon absorption of the object. A traditional muon detector, such as a cloud chamber or wire chamber, is difficult and expensive to develop and maintain in the field. They require high voltage (~2000V) and complex gas systems to maintain the correct ionization current. A simplified series of air-filled parallel-plate detectors are would be more functional. Some low voltage versions of the parallel-plate detectors have been constructed, and without any signal amplification they can detect currents from micro-curie alpha and beta emitting sources. Amplification is being added to the detectors to achieve enough sensitivity to detect cosmic-ray muons. Simulations have been run in LT Spice to determine the best amplification circuit for the detector. GEANT 4 simulations have also been utilized to discover the energy range required to detect the most cosmic-ray muons. Additionally, a purely theoretical integral has been coded and solved using Fortran to discover the theoretical energy range. Using the improved amplification electronics and the findings from the preliminary simulations of detector use, the device is expected to function as designed.