Academic department under which the project should be listed

Nursing

Faculty Sponsor Name

Jenna Shackleford

Systematic Review

Project Type

Event

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Title: A Systematic Review: The Impact of Social Support Programs on Caregiver Burnout for Caregivers of Children with Cancer

Background: In addition to children diagnosed with cancer, their caregivers may also experience hardship. While caregivers handle their own personal responsibilities, they also provide emotional, physical, and financial support to their children. In addition to the likely stress that occurs from caring for a child with a long-term illness, lack of social support, educational resources, or support programs may lead to caregiver burnout.

Objective: The purpose of the systematic review was to review published research focused on caregiver burnout for caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer and the impact of social support programs on caregiver burnout.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed and CINAHL databases to search for peer-reviewed journal articles that were published between 2011 and 2021. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to screen studies using specific keywords such as “caregiver”, “burnout”, “children with cancer”, “childhood cancer”, “social support program”, and “therapy”. Relevant articles were assessed and evaluated for the highest quality to include in the final review.

Results: Eight articles were chosen and assessed from the initial search. Interventions such as family therapy, internet-based self-help, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), promoting resilience in stress management for parents (PRISM-P), and religious participation demonstrated improvement in decreasing caregiver burnout for caregivers of children with cancer.

Conclusion: Social support, educational resources, and support programs may decrease the level of burnout for caregivers as they care for their children compared to caregivers with a lack of support.

Keywords: Childhood cancer, caregiver burden, social support

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A Systematic Review: The Impact of Social Support Programs on Caregiver Burnout for Caregivers of Children with Cancer

Title: A Systematic Review: The Impact of Social Support Programs on Caregiver Burnout for Caregivers of Children with Cancer

Background: In addition to children diagnosed with cancer, their caregivers may also experience hardship. While caregivers handle their own personal responsibilities, they also provide emotional, physical, and financial support to their children. In addition to the likely stress that occurs from caring for a child with a long-term illness, lack of social support, educational resources, or support programs may lead to caregiver burnout.

Objective: The purpose of the systematic review was to review published research focused on caregiver burnout for caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer and the impact of social support programs on caregiver burnout.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed and CINAHL databases to search for peer-reviewed journal articles that were published between 2011 and 2021. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to screen studies using specific keywords such as “caregiver”, “burnout”, “children with cancer”, “childhood cancer”, “social support program”, and “therapy”. Relevant articles were assessed and evaluated for the highest quality to include in the final review.

Results: Eight articles were chosen and assessed from the initial search. Interventions such as family therapy, internet-based self-help, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), promoting resilience in stress management for parents (PRISM-P), and religious participation demonstrated improvement in decreasing caregiver burnout for caregivers of children with cancer.

Conclusion: Social support, educational resources, and support programs may decrease the level of burnout for caregivers as they care for their children compared to caregivers with a lack of support.

Keywords: Childhood cancer, caregiver burden, social support