Project Title

Domestic Migration in The United States: A study of Patterns within Place and Space

Presenters

joshua kangerFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Geography & Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Paul McDaniels

no human subjects

Project Type

Event

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The purpose of this research is to identify specific routes and trends of domestic migration in the United States. Secondary quantitative data analysis in conjunction with the United States Census Bureau information is used to analyze domestic migration patterns between two metropolitan regions: Atlanta, Georgia and Chicago, Illinois. All counties of the surrounding metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) are compared to measure potential push and pull factors that stimulate migration between these geographical areas. Analysis of census data and net migration patterns reveal trends between these two urban regions. Examining domestic net migration between these two metropolitans gives examples into internal migration patterns.. Though domestic relocation has dwindled in recent years, the United States still nonetheless has some of the largest percentages of domestic resettlement. Examining specific counties of both the Atlanta, Georgia as well as the Chicago, Illinois metropolitan regions, data for each individual county illustrates patterns of migration between the years of 2014-2018. Examining patterns of domestic migration trends may ultimately help reveal and determine causes of why people choose to relocate. Observing statistics from the available data, patterns, trends, or even revelations about changes occurring in our society can be found by exploring trends among census data regarding domestic migration.

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Domestic Migration in The United States: A study of Patterns within Place and Space

The purpose of this research is to identify specific routes and trends of domestic migration in the United States. Secondary quantitative data analysis in conjunction with the United States Census Bureau information is used to analyze domestic migration patterns between two metropolitan regions: Atlanta, Georgia and Chicago, Illinois. All counties of the surrounding metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) are compared to measure potential push and pull factors that stimulate migration between these geographical areas. Analysis of census data and net migration patterns reveal trends between these two urban regions. Examining domestic net migration between these two metropolitans gives examples into internal migration patterns.. Though domestic relocation has dwindled in recent years, the United States still nonetheless has some of the largest percentages of domestic resettlement. Examining specific counties of both the Atlanta, Georgia as well as the Chicago, Illinois metropolitan regions, data for each individual county illustrates patterns of migration between the years of 2014-2018. Examining patterns of domestic migration trends may ultimately help reveal and determine causes of why people choose to relocate. Observing statistics from the available data, patterns, trends, or even revelations about changes occurring in our society can be found by exploring trends among census data regarding domestic migration.