Project Title

A Single-Cell Based Mathematical Model for Mammalian Cell Migration

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Mathematics

Faculty Sponsor Name

Yizeng Li

Additional Faculty

Glenn Young, Mathematics, gyoung19@kennesaw.edu

No experiments required, purely theoretical

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Mammalian cell migration plays a fundamental role in biological processes such as wound healing, cancer metastasis, morphogenesis. Cells utilize different mechanisms for migration depending on their microenvironment. On two-dimensional surfaces, migration is driven by actin polymerization. While in confined channels with high hydraulic resistance, migration can be driven by water permeation. Water permeation is driven by a polarized distribution of membrane proteins, including ion channels and aquaporin. Taking cancer metastasis as an example, breast cancer cells are known to have an overexpression of ion channels and pumps and sometimes migrate through confined environments that have elevated hydraulic pressure. This suggests that breast cancer cells can migrate in an ideal environment for the use of water permeation.

Despite the important role of ion and water transport(flux) in cell migration, the mathematical formulation of this mode of migration is relatively new. There are few models that allow the study of how ion and water fluxes through ion channels affect cell migration. We develop a single-cell based model for cell migration capable of studying directional solute fluxes. Model components such as actin polymerization and depolymerization, focal adhesions, polarization distribution of ion channels and pumps, external hydraulic resistance, cytoplasmic flow, and membrane tension are modeled through a set of coupled differential equations and are solved numerically in MATLAB. Steady state and transient states of cell migration will be discussed.

Project Type

Event

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A Single-Cell Based Mathematical Model for Mammalian Cell Migration

Mammalian cell migration plays a fundamental role in biological processes such as wound healing, cancer metastasis, morphogenesis. Cells utilize different mechanisms for migration depending on their microenvironment. On two-dimensional surfaces, migration is driven by actin polymerization. While in confined channels with high hydraulic resistance, migration can be driven by water permeation. Water permeation is driven by a polarized distribution of membrane proteins, including ion channels and aquaporin. Taking cancer metastasis as an example, breast cancer cells are known to have an overexpression of ion channels and pumps and sometimes migrate through confined environments that have elevated hydraulic pressure. This suggests that breast cancer cells can migrate in an ideal environment for the use of water permeation.

Despite the important role of ion and water transport(flux) in cell migration, the mathematical formulation of this mode of migration is relatively new. There are few models that allow the study of how ion and water fluxes through ion channels affect cell migration. We develop a single-cell based model for cell migration capable of studying directional solute fluxes. Model components such as actin polymerization and depolymerization, focal adhesions, polarization distribution of ion channels and pumps, external hydraulic resistance, cytoplasmic flow, and membrane tension are modeled through a set of coupled differential equations and are solved numerically in MATLAB. Steady state and transient states of cell migration will be discussed.