Project Title

Perfectionism and Using GroupMe to Engage in Academic Dishonesty

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Psychology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Jennifer Willard

Currently awaiting IRB approval. Once we have received approval we will collect data.

Project Type

Event

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Students with perfectionism tend to show poor academic adaptability (Rice & Dellwo, 2002). Because of their fears for failure in school, they may compensate for their self-perceived incompetency by committing academic dishonesty (Pino & Smith, 2003). The social media app, GroupMe, may be used as an outlet for academic dishonesty. For example, students can share answers to exams and other information via this app. In the current study, we investigate whether perfectionists are more likely to commit academic dishonesty through GroupMe compared to non-perfectionists. College students will be asked to complete an online survey assessing their perfectionistic tendencies, the extent to which they use GroupMe to commit academic violations, and their demographic information. We expect that participants who have higher levels of perfectionism are more likely to commit higher levels of academic dishonesty by using GroupMe than participants who have lower levels of perfectionism. Our results may provide a better understanding of whether perfectionists utilize GroupMe to commit academic dishonesty in college.

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Perfectionism and Using GroupMe to Engage in Academic Dishonesty

Students with perfectionism tend to show poor academic adaptability (Rice & Dellwo, 2002). Because of their fears for failure in school, they may compensate for their self-perceived incompetency by committing academic dishonesty (Pino & Smith, 2003). The social media app, GroupMe, may be used as an outlet for academic dishonesty. For example, students can share answers to exams and other information via this app. In the current study, we investigate whether perfectionists are more likely to commit academic dishonesty through GroupMe compared to non-perfectionists. College students will be asked to complete an online survey assessing their perfectionistic tendencies, the extent to which they use GroupMe to commit academic violations, and their demographic information. We expect that participants who have higher levels of perfectionism are more likely to commit higher levels of academic dishonesty by using GroupMe than participants who have lower levels of perfectionism. Our results may provide a better understanding of whether perfectionists utilize GroupMe to commit academic dishonesty in college.