Presenters

Jada RossFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CACM - Architecture

Faculty Sponsor Name

Ameen Farooq

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Housing is a fundamental human right, yet in the land of the free and home of the world’s greatest opportunities, the most vulnerable population are families with children, accounting for 33% of the homeless population. On a single night in January 2019, an estimated 171,670 people in families identify as homeless (National Alliance to End Homelessness, 2020). Families experiencing homelessness are often hidden, hindering a child’s cognitive development and the guardian(s) ability to provide the necessary resources for their family’s survival (Homelessness, Health, and Human Needs. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US), 1988.). The above facts are arguably evidence of unsuccessful policy, planning, and design strategies that have failed to create more sufficient housing solutions for families experiencing homelessness. This thesis addresses homelessness as a human right issue, and intends to spark an open conversation about how we can redefine our perceptions of families who experience homelessness. Additionally, the proposal aims to identify and explore the network of needs families are lacking through the design of a housing hub committed to the holistic development of homeless families experiencing disparities. Throughout research, several questions are inquired to develop mitigation strategies to combat homelessness. What are the current resources available to support these marginalized families? How is the lack of basic needs directly impacting families and their housing circumstances? How does Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs influence the mental and developmental health of homeless families? How can the establishment of a housing hub achieve a more independent and empowered environment for hidden families? Ultimately, the housing hub, integrating both dwelling and developmental components, is proposed to foster healing and self-sufficiency in the lives of homeless families.

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Rethinking the Basic Needs of the Invisible Society

Housing is a fundamental human right, yet in the land of the free and home of the world’s greatest opportunities, the most vulnerable population are families with children, accounting for 33% of the homeless population. On a single night in January 2019, an estimated 171,670 people in families identify as homeless (National Alliance to End Homelessness, 2020). Families experiencing homelessness are often hidden, hindering a child’s cognitive development and the guardian(s) ability to provide the necessary resources for their family’s survival (Homelessness, Health, and Human Needs. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US), 1988.). The above facts are arguably evidence of unsuccessful policy, planning, and design strategies that have failed to create more sufficient housing solutions for families experiencing homelessness. This thesis addresses homelessness as a human right issue, and intends to spark an open conversation about how we can redefine our perceptions of families who experience homelessness. Additionally, the proposal aims to identify and explore the network of needs families are lacking through the design of a housing hub committed to the holistic development of homeless families experiencing disparities. Throughout research, several questions are inquired to develop mitigation strategies to combat homelessness. What are the current resources available to support these marginalized families? How is the lack of basic needs directly impacting families and their housing circumstances? How does Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs influence the mental and developmental health of homeless families? How can the establishment of a housing hub achieve a more independent and empowered environment for hidden families? Ultimately, the housing hub, integrating both dwelling and developmental components, is proposed to foster healing and self-sufficiency in the lives of homeless families.