Academic department under which the project should be listed

SPCEET - Electrical and Computer Engineering

Faculty Sponsor Name

Bill Diong

Abstract (300 words maximum)

This presentation lays out the groundwork, advancements, and results of a three-stage wireless power receiver with the purpose of providing power to low-power electronic equipment that operate at 5V. The receiver incorporates an impedance matching network, a tripler circuit, a boost converter, and a super capacitor. The impedance matching network has been designed for 1GHz but through testing the receiver with a signal generator followed by an antenna, it has been found that the signal frequency of 996MHz yields optimal energy capture at the tested received power levels of 0dBm, 3dBm, and 6dBm. The signal is produced from a signal generator which sends power to the transmitting antenna, then wirelessly to the receiving antenna that is connected to the wireless power receiver, and the voltage boosted to charge the energy storage supercapacitor. With the optimal settings in place the system would be able to substitute for the wires powering low-voltage devices on aircraft, reducing the weight on board and allowing for these devices to be powered with radio frequency (RF) signals. This would save fuel and reduce carbon emission, thereby helping to slow climate change.

Project Type

Poster

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Wireless Power Receiver with Tripler Circuit, Boost Converter and Supercapacitor

This presentation lays out the groundwork, advancements, and results of a three-stage wireless power receiver with the purpose of providing power to low-power electronic equipment that operate at 5V. The receiver incorporates an impedance matching network, a tripler circuit, a boost converter, and a super capacitor. The impedance matching network has been designed for 1GHz but through testing the receiver with a signal generator followed by an antenna, it has been found that the signal frequency of 996MHz yields optimal energy capture at the tested received power levels of 0dBm, 3dBm, and 6dBm. The signal is produced from a signal generator which sends power to the transmitting antenna, then wirelessly to the receiving antenna that is connected to the wireless power receiver, and the voltage boosted to charge the energy storage supercapacitor. With the optimal settings in place the system would be able to substitute for the wires powering low-voltage devices on aircraft, reducing the weight on board and allowing for these devices to be powered with radio frequency (RF) signals. This would save fuel and reduce carbon emission, thereby helping to slow climate change.