Project Title

Evaluating Regional Agricultural Wastes as Substrates for the Mycelial Growth and Fruiting Body Yield of Pleurotus ostreatus

Presenters

Daniel RhinerFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

CSM - Molecular and Cellular Biology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Chris Cornelison PhD

Additional Faculty

Kyle Gabriel PhD, Molecular & Cellular Biology, kgabrie5@kennesaw.edu

I am still currently working on this thesis project.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Pleurotus ostreatus, commonly known as the oyster mushroom, is a widely cultivated culinary mushroom known for its ability to colonize a variety of lignocellulosic agricultural waste materials. The ability of P. ostreatus to colonize and decompose these types of wastes as growth substrates suggests a potential for this organism to be utilized in the conversion of agricultural waste streams into locally productive and regenerative systems. P. ostreatus is a saprophytic fungus that derives its nutrients from plant fibers, particularly lignin and cellulose. These compounds are decomposed by ligninolytic enzymes produced by the mushroom. Not only does the oyster mushroom decompose agricultural waste, the mushroom itself is a source of food for humans as well as ruminants. As the global demand for resources increases and resource availability declines, innovative approaches to resource management become increasingly valuable. The constant production of waste by conventional farming and the oyster mushroom’s ability to convert this waste efficiently into food is a highly compelling reason for research that has the potential to lead to the commercialization of these processes. This research aims to explore the cultivation of local mushroom isolates on regional agricultural wastes on a commercial scale. This data will address the knowledge gap regarding the use of Georgia’s agricultural wastes as mushroom substrate and the potential for increased mushroom yields and profit.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

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Evaluating Regional Agricultural Wastes as Substrates for the Mycelial Growth and Fruiting Body Yield of Pleurotus ostreatus

Pleurotus ostreatus, commonly known as the oyster mushroom, is a widely cultivated culinary mushroom known for its ability to colonize a variety of lignocellulosic agricultural waste materials. The ability of P. ostreatus to colonize and decompose these types of wastes as growth substrates suggests a potential for this organism to be utilized in the conversion of agricultural waste streams into locally productive and regenerative systems. P. ostreatus is a saprophytic fungus that derives its nutrients from plant fibers, particularly lignin and cellulose. These compounds are decomposed by ligninolytic enzymes produced by the mushroom. Not only does the oyster mushroom decompose agricultural waste, the mushroom itself is a source of food for humans as well as ruminants. As the global demand for resources increases and resource availability declines, innovative approaches to resource management become increasingly valuable. The constant production of waste by conventional farming and the oyster mushroom’s ability to convert this waste efficiently into food is a highly compelling reason for research that has the potential to lead to the commercialization of these processes. This research aims to explore the cultivation of local mushroom isolates on regional agricultural wastes on a commercial scale. This data will address the knowledge gap regarding the use of Georgia’s agricultural wastes as mushroom substrate and the potential for increased mushroom yields and profit.