Project Title

More Than A Tree: The Effects of Clarinet Production on Tanzanian Economy

Presenters

Academic department under which the project should be listed

COTA - Music

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Yunek/ Dr. Justus

Additional Faculty

Dr. Kayleen Justus, kjustus3@kennesaw.edu

This is a project that is based on findings in literature.

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The purpose of this project is to explore the effects of clarinet production on Tanzanian economy. Currently, the wood used to create clarinets, mpingo, is endangered. In this study, I look at the direct effects that mpingo harvesting for clarinets has on Tanzanian economy. I explore the history of clarinet and clarinet manufacturers, mpingo and its many uses among Tanzanians, the role of clarinet in Tanzania, regulation and distribution of mpingo, working conditions in Tanzania, and overall capital when it comes to mpingo. The methods I used to collect this data include a detailed literature review, traveling to Tanzania to conduct formal and informal interviews with locals, teaching and playing clarinet in Tanzanian schools, and participating in pruning and plantings of mpingo in Tanzanian communities. A direct correlation was found between pressures to harvest mpingo for clarinet production and a decrease in supply for local Makonde carvers that depend on mpingo to sustain local economies. While the harvesting of mpingo for clarinet production does bring in revenue to Tanzanian economy on a large scale, the tradeoff of possible commercial extinctness is far greater— not only for Tanzanian locals but clarinetists worldwide. Some implications to solve these problems are the use of alternative materials to make clarinets, clarinet education in Tanzanian schools to connect Western classical music to African culture, and increased forest regulations and certifications in Tanzania. Ultimately, this study demonstrates the social life of mpingo as a medium with the power to generate effects musically, economically, cross-culturally and corporeally as it relates to Tanzanian locals and the future of clarinet manufacturing.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

More Than A Tree: The Effects of Clarinet Production on Tanzanian Economy

The purpose of this project is to explore the effects of clarinet production on Tanzanian economy. Currently, the wood used to create clarinets, mpingo, is endangered. In this study, I look at the direct effects that mpingo harvesting for clarinets has on Tanzanian economy. I explore the history of clarinet and clarinet manufacturers, mpingo and its many uses among Tanzanians, the role of clarinet in Tanzania, regulation and distribution of mpingo, working conditions in Tanzania, and overall capital when it comes to mpingo. The methods I used to collect this data include a detailed literature review, traveling to Tanzania to conduct formal and informal interviews with locals, teaching and playing clarinet in Tanzanian schools, and participating in pruning and plantings of mpingo in Tanzanian communities. A direct correlation was found between pressures to harvest mpingo for clarinet production and a decrease in supply for local Makonde carvers that depend on mpingo to sustain local economies. While the harvesting of mpingo for clarinet production does bring in revenue to Tanzanian economy on a large scale, the tradeoff of possible commercial extinctness is far greater— not only for Tanzanian locals but clarinetists worldwide. Some implications to solve these problems are the use of alternative materials to make clarinets, clarinet education in Tanzanian schools to connect Western classical music to African culture, and increased forest regulations and certifications in Tanzania. Ultimately, this study demonstrates the social life of mpingo as a medium with the power to generate effects musically, economically, cross-culturally and corporeally as it relates to Tanzanian locals and the future of clarinet manufacturing.