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Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Geography & Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor Name

Paul McDaniel

Abstract (300 words maximum)

As food insecurity grows in complexity, the methods used to combat it must also evolve. In the Atlanta metropolitan area, direct community engagement and partnerships have led to the creation of small community garden and urban agriculture operations on public lands. However, food insecurity continues to be a problem, particularly in low-income areas where resources are fewer, such as areas within DeKalb County, Georgia. This project seeks to understand ways in which integrating food policy and planning into existing green infrastructure can mitigate issues related to food insecurity in DeKalb County and considers the following questions: How can food policy and urban agriculture center the needs of diverse populations living in suburban areas in DeKalb County? How can local government and non-profits utilize existing resources to address food insecurity? How might location-allocation be used to identify sites best suited for urban agriculture and community gardens? The research occurs in two parts: literature content analysis of the environmental and social impacts that urban community gardens have on cities and metro areas, highlighting coordinated food policy and governance surrounding such gardens, and a GIS location analysis of the parks and greenspaces in DeKalb County to assess the potential for community gardens. GIS location analysis will yield the spaces most suited to support small-scale community agriculture projects

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Urban Food Policy, Planning, and Security: A Location Analysis and Potential Impacts of Creating Community Gardens in DeKalb County, GA

As food insecurity grows in complexity, the methods used to combat it must also evolve. In the Atlanta metropolitan area, direct community engagement and partnerships have led to the creation of small community garden and urban agriculture operations on public lands. However, food insecurity continues to be a problem, particularly in low-income areas where resources are fewer, such as areas within DeKalb County, Georgia. This project seeks to understand ways in which integrating food policy and planning into existing green infrastructure can mitigate issues related to food insecurity in DeKalb County and considers the following questions: How can food policy and urban agriculture center the needs of diverse populations living in suburban areas in DeKalb County? How can local government and non-profits utilize existing resources to address food insecurity? How might location-allocation be used to identify sites best suited for urban agriculture and community gardens? The research occurs in two parts: literature content analysis of the environmental and social impacts that urban community gardens have on cities and metro areas, highlighting coordinated food policy and governance surrounding such gardens, and a GIS location analysis of the parks and greenspaces in DeKalb County to assess the potential for community gardens. GIS location analysis will yield the spaces most suited to support small-scale community agriculture projects