Project Title

Life of an Institutionalized Sub-Citizen

Presenters

Wendy ArguetaFollow

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Social Work and Human Services

Research Mentor Name

Denise Green

Abstract (300 words maximum)

The purpose of this project is to analyze and challenge the current systems that are in place to serve people with severe disabilities. For the purpose of the term “Sub-Citizen” is used to describe the current situation of persons with severe disabilities. The research question that is intended to be addressed is “Are institutionalized Sub-Citizens treated as prisoners?” Examples of being treated like a prisoner are that the sub-citizens are A) diminished or no decision making; B) diminished or no decision making in medical care (women’s reproductive rights); C0 diminished or no decision making in the process of legal protection in self-determination; D) less rights than prisoners in legal proceedings in the court system. The perception of caring for persons with disabilities perceptions were examined, the results indicated that attitudes towards women with intellectual disabilities could compromise women’s reproductive rights. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) highlighted a range of disability human rights concerns in Australia. The concerns included high violence against women with disabilities and poor compliance with accessibility standards and regulations. Other concerns included the legalization and use of involuntary medical treatment and the practice of involuntary or coerced sterilization of persons with disabilities. Another example is many jurisdictions have laws that counteract a contract where the sub-citizen can be found to lack the legal capacity to contract. An example would be when a person with disabilities is disproportionately placed under trusteeship or guardianship and loses their legal capacity to contract.

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Life of an Institutionalized Sub-Citizen

The purpose of this project is to analyze and challenge the current systems that are in place to serve people with severe disabilities. For the purpose of the term “Sub-Citizen” is used to describe the current situation of persons with severe disabilities. The research question that is intended to be addressed is “Are institutionalized Sub-Citizens treated as prisoners?” Examples of being treated like a prisoner are that the sub-citizens are A) diminished or no decision making; B) diminished or no decision making in medical care (women’s reproductive rights); C0 diminished or no decision making in the process of legal protection in self-determination; D) less rights than prisoners in legal proceedings in the court system. The perception of caring for persons with disabilities perceptions were examined, the results indicated that attitudes towards women with intellectual disabilities could compromise women’s reproductive rights. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) highlighted a range of disability human rights concerns in Australia. The concerns included high violence against women with disabilities and poor compliance with accessibility standards and regulations. Other concerns included the legalization and use of involuntary medical treatment and the practice of involuntary or coerced sterilization of persons with disabilities. Another example is many jurisdictions have laws that counteract a contract where the sub-citizen can be found to lack the legal capacity to contract. An example would be when a person with disabilities is disproportionately placed under trusteeship or guardianship and loses their legal capacity to contract.