Project Title

Semi-Private versus Private Rooms - Cancer Patients

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Wellstar School of Nursing

Research Mentor Name

Dr. Christie Emerson & Courtney Thompson

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Abstract

Most treatments for cancer to be eradicated from the body include surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. These three treatments are among the most immunocompromising that any one person can have. Research articles about infection rates, Hospital Associated Infections (HAIs), infection prevention were evaluated. Articles about the design of semi-private rooms compared to private inpatient rooms relating to health outcomes in the light of infections from HAIs, medical errors, falls, and overall content with being in a quieter private room were also used. A question of safety for these patients rose up being in their current state and having the risk of being in a semi-private room. The literature was formed to answer the question of, is there a risk with hospitalized oncology patients being placed in a semi-private room compared to those in a private room? Data has been retrieved from 5 articles regarding nosocomial infections among cancer patients and the rise of the newer all private room hospitals. It will be regarded that no research was found on actual infection rates of immunocompromised patients inside semi-private rooms with another occupant, making multiple source data collection the tool for decision-making. A proposal study is to take the infection rates of hospitalized immunocompromised patients inside private rooms compared to those who are inside the Emergency Department of Kennestone Hospital where most people are in very close contact with each other before entering a room or are in semi-private rooms divided by curtains inside the EMS Offload holding. Each patient will have blood cultures, urinalyses, and chest x-rays performed at the start of entering the Emergency Department and during their stay once admitted, and the control group will be evaluated on their status as the study begins and before their discharge for a period of 1 year of research.

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COinS
 

Semi-Private versus Private Rooms - Cancer Patients

Abstract

Most treatments for cancer to be eradicated from the body include surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. These three treatments are among the most immunocompromising that any one person can have. Research articles about infection rates, Hospital Associated Infections (HAIs), infection prevention were evaluated. Articles about the design of semi-private rooms compared to private inpatient rooms relating to health outcomes in the light of infections from HAIs, medical errors, falls, and overall content with being in a quieter private room were also used. A question of safety for these patients rose up being in their current state and having the risk of being in a semi-private room. The literature was formed to answer the question of, is there a risk with hospitalized oncology patients being placed in a semi-private room compared to those in a private room? Data has been retrieved from 5 articles regarding nosocomial infections among cancer patients and the rise of the newer all private room hospitals. It will be regarded that no research was found on actual infection rates of immunocompromised patients inside semi-private rooms with another occupant, making multiple source data collection the tool for decision-making. A proposal study is to take the infection rates of hospitalized immunocompromised patients inside private rooms compared to those who are inside the Emergency Department of Kennestone Hospital where most people are in very close contact with each other before entering a room or are in semi-private rooms divided by curtains inside the EMS Offload holding. Each patient will have blood cultures, urinalyses, and chest x-rays performed at the start of entering the Emergency Department and during their stay once admitted, and the control group will be evaluated on their status as the study begins and before their discharge for a period of 1 year of research.