Project Title

Discharge Teaching for Non-English Speaking Postpartum Patients

Academic department under which the project should be listed

Nursing

Research Mentor Name

Ms. Jan Turner

Additional Faculty

Dr. Christie Emerson, Nursing, cermerson@kennesaw.edu

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Background: There is a high incidence of non-English speaking mothers being provided discharge teaching in English and not their native language. Discharge instruction handouts (i.e. about breastfeeding, how to put the baby to sleep, and safe haven laws) are often printed in English. How does implementing translation tablets at the time of postpartum discharge for non-English speaking women improve patient satisfaction? Brief Literature Review: It was found that implementing translation requirements at the time of discharge increased patient satisfaction. The current practice is to print discharge instructions and teach them in English, even when the patient’s primary language is not English. After an observational study and chart review, it was determined that translation devices were used in only 6 out of 10 times (60%) when discharge instructions were provided to non-English speaking mothers. It was also determined that only 65% of non-English speaking patients were happy with discharge teaching per the patient discharge satisfaction survey. Methods: Medical translators are provided in most hospitals via tablets. Tablet translators will be used 100% of the time to provide postpartum teaching in non-English speaking patients. This will then be documented so that nurse managers can ensure non-English speaking patients understand discharge instructions. Staff education will be provided annually to ensure that nurses know how to properly use tablet translators. This education will also be administered to all newly hired nurses. Evaluation: The goal is that 100% of nurses who provide discharge teaching to non-English speaking patients in postpartum use a translation tablet device and that they also print instructions in the patient’s primary language. The patient satisfaction score at the time of discharge for non-English speaking patients will also be used to determine if this intervention is successful. The satisfaction score benchmark aims to meet a 90% patient satisfaction score for the discharge process.

Keywords: postpartum, non-English speaking, translation, discharge teaching, patient satisfaction

Disciplines

Maternal, Child Health and Neonatal Nursing

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Discharge Teaching for Non-English Speaking Postpartum Patients

Background: There is a high incidence of non-English speaking mothers being provided discharge teaching in English and not their native language. Discharge instruction handouts (i.e. about breastfeeding, how to put the baby to sleep, and safe haven laws) are often printed in English. How does implementing translation tablets at the time of postpartum discharge for non-English speaking women improve patient satisfaction? Brief Literature Review: It was found that implementing translation requirements at the time of discharge increased patient satisfaction. The current practice is to print discharge instructions and teach them in English, even when the patient’s primary language is not English. After an observational study and chart review, it was determined that translation devices were used in only 6 out of 10 times (60%) when discharge instructions were provided to non-English speaking mothers. It was also determined that only 65% of non-English speaking patients were happy with discharge teaching per the patient discharge satisfaction survey. Methods: Medical translators are provided in most hospitals via tablets. Tablet translators will be used 100% of the time to provide postpartum teaching in non-English speaking patients. This will then be documented so that nurse managers can ensure non-English speaking patients understand discharge instructions. Staff education will be provided annually to ensure that nurses know how to properly use tablet translators. This education will also be administered to all newly hired nurses. Evaluation: The goal is that 100% of nurses who provide discharge teaching to non-English speaking patients in postpartum use a translation tablet device and that they also print instructions in the patient’s primary language. The patient satisfaction score at the time of discharge for non-English speaking patients will also be used to determine if this intervention is successful. The satisfaction score benchmark aims to meet a 90% patient satisfaction score for the discharge process.

Keywords: postpartum, non-English speaking, translation, discharge teaching, patient satisfaction