Project Title

EARLY INTERVENTION OUTDOOR SENSORY PROGRAM USING APPLIED BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

Academic department under which the project should be listed

WCHHS - Social Work and Human Services

Faculty Sponsor Name

Jennifer Wade-Berg

Disciplines

Disability Studies | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Abstract (300 words maximum)

EARLY INTERVENTION OUTDOOR SENSORY PROGRAM USING APPLIED BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

Josephine Nelson, Candidate for B.S. in Human Service with

a concentration in Social Engagement and Advocacy

Department of Social Work and Human Services

Research Mentor: Jennifer A. Wade-Berg

Abstract

Studies have indicated the effectiveness of applied behavior analysis in building a wide range of essential skills and reducing behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorder, enabling them to live independently across multiple environments and enhancing opportunities for self-learning (Al-Khateeb, 2021). This project implements a 3-dimensional outdoor early intervention learning program using nature-themed sensory bins at the North Georgia Autism Center. The center's mission is to bring North Georgia the best in every Autism community we are privileged to serve. At the center, the objective is to increase beneficial behavioral skills and increase attentive skills. The literature suggests and reflects that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often become entranced in one topic and revert all their attention to that, rather than their surroundings. They also are hypersensitive to certain stimuli, including noise, colors, people, etc., that are a part of everyday life (Barakat, 2019). Although The North Georgia Autism Center, and other researched Autism Centers, implement early childhood intervention for many children with ASD in group settings (Eapen et al., 2013), there are not a lot of implementations of outdoor learning and naturalistic play. Another goal of the outdoor intervention is to implement 3D natural learning objects using sensory bins. These objects include pretend foods, bugs, leaves, dirt, flowers, sticks, rocks, water, plants, animals, and other outdoor elements that the children can interact with. The literature reviewed gathers data on how outdoor learning interventions help or do not help children with ASD. Much of the literature is in support of outdoor learning and physical activity. This study integrates this information to create an accessible outdoor intervention program so kids can safely engage with stimuli and become desensitized to potential triggers.

Keywords: Autism, Early Intervention, ABA Therapy, Outdoor Learning

Project Type

Poster

How will this be presented?

Yes, in person

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EARLY INTERVENTION OUTDOOR SENSORY PROGRAM USING APPLIED BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

EARLY INTERVENTION OUTDOOR SENSORY PROGRAM USING APPLIED BEHAVIORAL ANALYSIS FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

Josephine Nelson, Candidate for B.S. in Human Service with

a concentration in Social Engagement and Advocacy

Department of Social Work and Human Services

Research Mentor: Jennifer A. Wade-Berg

Abstract

Studies have indicated the effectiveness of applied behavior analysis in building a wide range of essential skills and reducing behavioral problems in children with autism spectrum disorder, enabling them to live independently across multiple environments and enhancing opportunities for self-learning (Al-Khateeb, 2021). This project implements a 3-dimensional outdoor early intervention learning program using nature-themed sensory bins at the North Georgia Autism Center. The center's mission is to bring North Georgia the best in every Autism community we are privileged to serve. At the center, the objective is to increase beneficial behavioral skills and increase attentive skills. The literature suggests and reflects that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often become entranced in one topic and revert all their attention to that, rather than their surroundings. They also are hypersensitive to certain stimuli, including noise, colors, people, etc., that are a part of everyday life (Barakat, 2019). Although The North Georgia Autism Center, and other researched Autism Centers, implement early childhood intervention for many children with ASD in group settings (Eapen et al., 2013), there are not a lot of implementations of outdoor learning and naturalistic play. Another goal of the outdoor intervention is to implement 3D natural learning objects using sensory bins. These objects include pretend foods, bugs, leaves, dirt, flowers, sticks, rocks, water, plants, animals, and other outdoor elements that the children can interact with. The literature reviewed gathers data on how outdoor learning interventions help or do not help children with ASD. Much of the literature is in support of outdoor learning and physical activity. This study integrates this information to create an accessible outdoor intervention program so kids can safely engage with stimuli and become desensitized to potential triggers.

Keywords: Autism, Early Intervention, ABA Therapy, Outdoor Learning

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