Project Title

Using a Motion Compensating Tracking System to Study the Behavior of Fire Ants

Academic department under which the project should be listed

SPCEET - Mechanical Engineering

Faculty Sponsor Name

Dal Hyung Kim

Disciplines

Animal Experimentation and Research | Behavior and Ethology | Mechanical Engineering

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Insects are a common staple in the research industry due to their unique and diverse characteristics and behavior. In recent years, however, more and more studies have been using some sort of tethering device which reduces natural movement and behavior in some insects. More specifically, flying insects, such as fruit flies and silk moths, who instinctively take flight whenever they encounter a stimulus gradient (e.g., change in vibration, aroma, light, and temperature). Our research focuses on tracking red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) without tethering by using the transparent omnidirectional locomotion compensator (TOLC). The TOLC acts as an infinite space which allows the insect to navigate freely without restrictive movement. The device implements a model predictive control feedback to track and gather data from the ant’s movement. Various data have been collected and processed through MATLAB code, such as position, velocity, probability density function, cumulative distribution function, gaiting speed, and error graphs. The data will then be compared to the ant’s anatomical size to see if there are any correlation.

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

How will this be presented?

Yes, synchronously via Teams

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Using a Motion Compensating Tracking System to Study the Behavior of Fire Ants

Insects are a common staple in the research industry due to their unique and diverse characteristics and behavior. In recent years, however, more and more studies have been using some sort of tethering device which reduces natural movement and behavior in some insects. More specifically, flying insects, such as fruit flies and silk moths, who instinctively take flight whenever they encounter a stimulus gradient (e.g., change in vibration, aroma, light, and temperature). Our research focuses on tracking red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) without tethering by using the transparent omnidirectional locomotion compensator (TOLC). The TOLC acts as an infinite space which allows the insect to navigate freely without restrictive movement. The device implements a model predictive control feedback to track and gather data from the ant’s movement. Various data have been collected and processed through MATLAB code, such as position, velocity, probability density function, cumulative distribution function, gaiting speed, and error graphs. The data will then be compared to the ant’s anatomical size to see if there are any correlation.

blog comments powered by Disqus