Academic department under which the project should be listed

RCHSS - Psychological Science

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Faculty Sponsor Name

Dr. Kyung Hun Jung

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract (300 words maximum)

Abstract

Previous studies on human driver takeover performance (reclaiming control from the vehicle) assume that automated vehicles (AV) are able to release a takeover request in a timely manner and we wanted to see what role music had on this. To improve the AV’s safety, its windshield includes the planned trajectory to be able to function in the possible absence of the takeover request. We have hypothesized that a driver listening to music with a higher beats per minute (BPM) would have a slower reaction time when it is time to complete the takeover request to avoid a collision and when listening to a slower BPM the takeover request will happen faster. To test this theory, we conducted a driving-simulation experiment in which participants observed the driving state of an AV while listening to a song that is 160 bpm (Hey Ya!) or 80 bpm (Halo) as well as the projection of the intended trajectory of the vehicle on the windshield. When the song with 160 bpm was played against the song with 80 bpm, the accident rate was higher by # percent and the reaction time was by # m/s according to the results. This study shows how music with higher beats per minute can distract drivers' takeover response in terms of situational awareness with the AV’s planned trajectory projected, even when an explicit takeover request has not been released.

Keywords: planned trajectory, takeover performance, augmented reality, head-up display, automated vehicles, self-driving vehicles. Music, beats per minute

Project Type

Oral Presentation (15-min time slots)

How will this be presented?

Yes, asynchronously via recorded video upload

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Projecting Planned Trajectory on an Automated Vehicle via Augmented Reality: Music’s Effect on Takeover Performance

Abstract

Previous studies on human driver takeover performance (reclaiming control from the vehicle) assume that automated vehicles (AV) are able to release a takeover request in a timely manner and we wanted to see what role music had on this. To improve the AV’s safety, its windshield includes the planned trajectory to be able to function in the possible absence of the takeover request. We have hypothesized that a driver listening to music with a higher beats per minute (BPM) would have a slower reaction time when it is time to complete the takeover request to avoid a collision and when listening to a slower BPM the takeover request will happen faster. To test this theory, we conducted a driving-simulation experiment in which participants observed the driving state of an AV while listening to a song that is 160 bpm (Hey Ya!) or 80 bpm (Halo) as well as the projection of the intended trajectory of the vehicle on the windshield. When the song with 160 bpm was played against the song with 80 bpm, the accident rate was higher by # percent and the reaction time was by # m/s according to the results. This study shows how music with higher beats per minute can distract drivers' takeover response in terms of situational awareness with the AV’s planned trajectory projected, even when an explicit takeover request has not been released.

Keywords: planned trajectory, takeover performance, augmented reality, head-up display, automated vehicles, self-driving vehicles. Music, beats per minute

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